Behind the Golf Brand Podcast with Paul Liberatore

#58 - GALWAY BAY Rain Gear: Bryan Finnerty (CEO)

September 01, 2021 Paul Liberatore Season 2 Episode 58
Behind the Golf Brand Podcast with Paul Liberatore
#58 - GALWAY BAY Rain Gear: Bryan Finnerty (CEO)
Show Notes Transcript

We made it to Episode 58 of the Behind the Golf Brand Podcast.  In this week's episode, I interview my good friends Bryan Finnerty, the CEO of GALWAY BAY rain gear. 

When Galway Bay says waterproof, they mean it. All Galway Bay jackets and pants are made from their proprietary fabric, Galway Bay Hydro-Flex 32. This breakthrough material is a three-layer fabric with double durable water repellent coating including Teflon that’s designed to not only keep water from getting in, but to allow sweat to get out.

They have designed their gear to be versatile, comfortable and fashionable. Galway Bay provides protection from the wind and rain while still allowing players to take an unrestricted swing. So you can look and play great even when the weather isn’t.

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Speaker 1:

Today , we play a golf. Let me show you how we do it in the pros. Welcome to behind the golf grand podcast. I've never missed with the seminar , a conversation with some of the most interesting innovators and entrepreneurs behind the biggest names in golf. My friends were the golf clubs. I lived on the golf course. I lived on the driving range from pro talk . You should learn something from each and every single round. You play it to fun from on and off the green. Why would you play golf? You don't play it for money. Just let me put the ball in the hole. This is behind the golf brand podcast with Paul libertory .

Speaker 2:

What's up guys? Thanks for being here. If you're on the live stream today, I really have a good friend, Brian. Finnerty Brian and I became friends probably like two months ago, but like our call , uh , Pride's not the right CEO or president. How would you say that for whatever,

Speaker 3:

You know , do everything and he's the

Speaker 2:

Top dog. Yeah , a V1 sports we like and talk for probably like what two and a half hours that day, but only like 45 minutes of it was on the show. Then we were talking, he was like, Hey, I have another brand. And I was like, seriously. And he's like, yeah, it's called golf , Galway bay. The Goller Galloway. I say away . I was thinking Irish person by Australian. All my access are the same. So it's okay. It's really cool because he has another brand. I was like, I gotta come back and talk about it today. We're going to talk cause episode 58, I was forget, as you guys know of behind the call brand podcast and I have my friend Brian Infiniti , who is the CEO also of Callway bay.

Speaker 3:

Welcome to the show again. Great. Great to be here. I'm ready to go. I'm ready to go coffee in hand.

Speaker 2:

What made you buy another? Not buy, but what made you invest in college? I guess, first of all, what is call it bay for people don't know?

Speaker 3:

Yeah. I mean, it's in a very simple form. It's outerwear. You want to wear , you know, we've all, we've all been around. If you played any golf and not on a beautiful sunny day, like, you know, I'm sitting here at Michigan looking at, but that nasty day that , uh, you know, you planned on a Saturday with your buddies for awhile and it rains not hard , but you want to get after maybe it does rain hard. Uh, you put on some oversize jacket that didn't fit. You pulled on a pair of golf, condom pants and cinch the top , uh, fumbled through, you said, I could say anything fumble through the side and try to find your T's and ball markers. So yeah, in 2010 slash 11, Terry [inaudible] , who was the original founder designed a pair of pants that you could wear that literally just look like nice golf slacks. They're really nice actually, but they were a hundred percent waterproof and then he made a line version of that. So you could play on a really cold nasty day. And those were the two flagship products, 2011. And it was this cool underground swell of, we love it. Can you do a jacket? Can you do a vest? I met Terry in 2015 and he was kind of at this point, I think like a lot of small startup companies are that, what do you want to be when you grow up? You know , do you want to be a cool little garage band? Or do you want to kind of go on tour? Terry being in his mid sixties said, look, I can see the brand going in big places. I'm not just sure that I want to be the guy doing it. So I got together with them and we put together a fund to invest in the company, let him take some chips off the table, which rightfully so he was able to do still keep him involved as an owner. And then , uh , we had some capital to grow the, grow the business. And specifically we took investors in number one, had a passion for golf. And whether it be in marketing or finance had some connections to the industry, that's typically kind of my Mo I like to get strategic investors and the guys and gals had just, you know , love to run with it. So that was in 15. And here we are in 2021, we've won the, my golf spy award back to back to back 18, 19 20 against some really big brands. I just think we're doing cool things in the industry. Again, we've got pants that you can wear. You wear a belt that you can wear them into the clubhouse after you play. Uh , if it never rained, you'd look sharp and if it totally poured on you, you'd be dry. So that's kind of our gears that it's where you want to wear. But most importantly, it's a very technical company. As you know , we talked about, even with V1, I enjoy technology. And to me, it had to be something that looks sharp, breathable, usable, you know, I'd want to wear it to a human football game. I wouldn't mind wearing it into the clubhouse after around a golf. And I didn't want it just to get stuffed in the side of a golf bag. So if you look at at Gallway bay, we're different because we, number one, we don't suggest that it's something you shove in your golf bag and use when it rains. It's something that you'd say I'm going out to play today. And it might be a little bit nasty. I want to put on the best stuff. That's kind of our deal. So

Speaker 2:

How did you meet him? Was it like having a band or was it like just friends or same circles or what was that? One

Speaker 3:

Of my good friends who lives in Minnesota, Wisconsin actually connected through our golf clubs. He had met Terry at an outing and then Terry came to Detroit to play at another outing. I got a chance to meet him. And the first year we knew each other, it was had nothing to do with investment. It was, I've got this company and I just don't know what to do with it. So would you say he asked me if I'd essentially mentor him, right. I , that might be an overstatement, but just give me some advice. And so I spent a year Rytary we talk every single week, laid out a business plan, helped him kind of hold them accountable to executing off the plan. He almost doubled that year, first year that he had doubled since he started the company. And I think for him, it was, wow, this is not going it alone has some value. And that's then we built some trust together. And I think from there, he's like, Hey, if I was going to raise some money, I'd love for you to be involved. Who should we get? Like, I , number one, the guys you met up in Wisconsin would be a great start. Let's kind of build the group out of that. I won't say it was super easy, but it was simple.

Speaker 2:

Did he ask you to help him out, like to be his mentor ish or that's just kind of your natural,

Speaker 3:

You know , we were friendly just much like you and I started our last conversation. You know, we started shooting the breeze and my style is either going to resonate with you, or you're probably going to run for the Hills as fast as you can. I'm a huge servant leader guy and whatever information that I may have gleaned from great people that have shared it with me. I love to pass that on. I'm an abundance stinker . So I don't believe that Paul, if your company is doing awesome than mine must be doing bad, I believe we both can do great. There's always enough market share. I don't think we have to step on each other and each other's throats to get there. And that's my mentality and it's not one big warm, fuzzy hug. There's some reality in that, that if you have a really crappy product, there may be no future for it. But with what Terry had really come up with. And he's a super bright guy, the fact that he cared about the technical fabric side of it really resonated with me. And I think he could tell that my passion for golf and the fact that I'm not a fair weather golfer. So I do play on crappy, windy, rainy days. I do actually enjoy while other guys are about, you know, wet grips. And I can't believe we're out here playing , um , probably harder .

Speaker 2:

That sounds like fun to me, man. Cause I, I played a hot sun and I I'll play. I'll almost die, you know? But like I enjoy it. It's like, I don't know . It goes

Speaker 3:

Back to my pro soccer days, right ? I think at the end of the day, you can either thrive in an environment or complain about it. And we all know who ends up winning games. Most of the time, it's the guys who look for those opportunities. So the same thing went and Terry had that, that mantra. So I think we just kind of clicked. And honestly, the first year I didn't charge him a consulting fee. It wasn't like, Hey, let me take you on as a client. It was just say, I'm a guy who's been in sports tech for a long time. I'm an avid golfer. So you're not going to have to tell me how nice it is to wear something that has four way flex that breeds you not sweating. Your cahones is off when you wear it. Didn't have to convince me of any of that. So I think for him, it was a really easy fit and he just loved having his hands in the dough . And from a entrepreneurial point of view, those are the guys that I love, you know, they're in, they're vested, they've got cash in the deal. It isn't like, Hey, I've got a great idea. And I raised a bunch of money from other people. And if it doesn't work out, no skin off my nose, no , he was all in. So it was very cool.

Speaker 2:

So did he start the brand himself like bad ? What year did he, when did he started

Speaker 3:

2010 was the first year that he kind of garage started it. So he found a supplier in Atlanta to kind of make, I think 50, 60 pairs of pants gave them to his buddies, did a bunch of trim this and this down, make this bigger, all that stuff. And then in 11, he got a production company, both in the states and in China. And then by 15, when I met him, I think they were doing a thousand or 1500 pairs a year. And that was the year that we kind of moved from shipping out of a small little office in Alpharetta, Georgia to moving to a distribution center. One of our partners owns a large marketing firm, you know , deals with Ford and Pepsi and those kinds of big brands. We really just moved right into the limelight. But yeah, when he started, it was

Speaker 2:

Just real brand, not like a hobby brand. Yeah. And that's not a bad thing. Right. It's just that, like, it takes a lot of time and a lot of energy and a lot of money to bridge that gap, you know,

Speaker 3:

But you can go lean and mean in when you're a hobby brand. I mean, he was driving to trade shows, you know, going to the section event in South Carolina on knowing it was going to rain that weekend, you know, Terry gets a ton of credit for starting this thing up. And then by 2000 , awesome . Yeah . By 2018 he had said, all right, I've kind of done what I wanted to do with this. And I'm open to being bought out, which we did, you know, a nice send off for him. And , uh, I then took , uh, the majority of his shares and became the managing partner of the company. So yeah. Then I'd been a win-win for everybody. I'd say

Speaker 2:

That's cool . So that's kind of like the Cinderella story, right. When you're a brand you're like, oh, hopefully someday. Well here's all this what I think. Right. So people think, oh, I want this to be my full-time job. Right. Yep . Which is a big, if you could make that your full-time job, you must have like a sugar mommy, right. Or a sugar daddy because you know, people always go, oh, what are you going to go for? When are you going to go full time ? Like never, I don't know, seriously, I'm able to grow quickly because I'm able to reinvest every penny I make. Right. But if you're using it to live off of, you're not able to reinvest it, which I think accelerates growth. That's a hard leap, you know, to make it your full-time gig and to really focus that energy on that. Yeah. But so

Speaker 3:

You just, you hit the nail on the head. I mean, at the end of the day, when you have the latitude to reinvest in the company, without having to take it out, so you can make a mortgage payment or car payment or whatever, when I'm looking at other companies for founders that are in this spot, when they're generating cashflow , I want to see every dime going back in the company. And when they've said, Hey , I kind of burned the boats to shore. And this is all I've got, that's a little concerning to me, you know, unless they're on some crazy hockey stick trajectory. But for those that mostly are doing organic growth. When a guy says, Hey, I can only give 25 to 30 hours a week because I have to spend 10, 15, 20 hours doing this to pay the bills. I'm like, that's totally cool. Right. Let us give you capital to go grow that. And ultimately then come to a decision point of, I think it's time. I think it's time to go full-time and roll into this thing.

Speaker 2:

That's like me, everyone's like, how many hours do you spend on it ? I'm like, I don't even know if you can add how many hours you actually put into it, then you don't put enough time into it. It's my opinion. Because like in like a dollar an hour. Yeah. Like seriously, when my kids go to bed, I'm up working on it. You know, I moved for a little work in the morning, you know, I just do it when I have these little gaps of time. I mean, I'm on year three. Right. But my, my whole thing was long-term it was fun that it's nice when you can do it the right way, starting out. Right. So you're not like trying to like make a quick buck or something like that, so that it gives you the more flexibility, but I'm willing to put my money where my mouth is and I'm willing to lose money on stuff. I don't, you know? Yeah. It sucks. You know, what are you going to do? That's how you learn. I thought, actually I saw some this weekend, like I was talking about a very large brand, came out to Arizona and had me do a bunch of videos with them. Right. They pay me to do it, which is really cool. That's a big step for me. We were talking about that same thing where it's like, you know , the only way you really learn in life is through failure. That's what I feel like, you know, you might get some in early, you get some wins, you might learn something. But I feel like if you fail at something, you go, Nope, never doing that. Or I should readjust. Or, but that's like the story of an entrepreneur, right? Like you really gotta be willing to take those risks and why people don't want to do that . Yeah.

Speaker 3:

A lot of people don't even know what a win looks like. We can go deep on this too. But

Speaker 2:

How many ,

Speaker 3:

I can't tell you them . People I've talked to, I mean, a hundred percent agreement that you learned , learned the most from your failures. If you know what a win would have looked like, right? So if you don't know what the win looks like, failure then ends up just being something, somebody hands you. And you know it after the fact, if you knew you were going to do, let's say a deal with PGA tour superstores and you invested a hundred thousand dollars in I'll use our brand, right. A hundred

Speaker 2:

Thousand dollars. And you know, Randy

Speaker 3:

V1 were in every one of their stores. Super

Speaker 2:

Friendly . Awesome as hell, man. And he's like the nicest guy anyway . Sorry. Yeah ,

Speaker 3:

Top-down right. You take Arthur blank all the way down.

Speaker 2:

Oh, it is. So,

Speaker 3:

But what I will tell you is if we had invested a hundred thousand dollars to get into retail, which Galway bay is a direct to consumer brand, but had we done that and knew we were going to spend it and at the end of the day did not get the account. Then we know that we blew through a hundred grand that we could use somewhere else . That's a loss, that's a total L but we knew we were going to get versus just sort of Willy nilly , spending a bunch of money and hoping you get somewhere. And then you go, wow , we didn't get that account. Or we didn't get this account. You don't really learn anything. If you didn't understand where you were supposed to be in the first place. So I think it does start with, what do you want to be and what , where do you want to go? And yeah, if you have to course correct and , or take a hit and not get there, if you're not learning, then I learned a lot of shares pretty

Speaker 2:

Quick. I learned so much this year. I haven't heard a lot, some stories like when I first did my website, I learned so much because I broke it so many times when I say break, I mean like bad. Right? And so it's like, now you have to figure it out, but you have no money. Right. Because you're not making any money. So now you gotta just figure it out. And then, you know, last year I started doing e-com a little bit with my own brand and that's a whole other ball of wax. I didn't know anything about it. And I spent a ton of money, you know, can I put that back into like the other site ? Yeah. I could have , but now I know a ton about e-com and I also have a better respect for these smaller brands. He comes up really, really, really hard it's so doggy dog, anybody could be an e-com person. I mean really just go buy something. Yeah. W we lived there, so I hear you feel your pain for sure. Did he come to you and be like, Hey, I want you to mentor me or did you just like to , Hey, do you need help? It's probably

Speaker 3:

A blend. I mean, he , you know , there was definitely an ask. Do you have time? Will you spend some time with me? And I think we may have talked about this last show, but I had just sold another company. Um, totally unrelated sports tech cell phone insurance company. And I was taking a year off. That's your favorite area? I know , you know, it's like, I missed the ball.

Speaker 2:

Don't do not go into cell phone insurance guys. That's

Speaker 3:

What I've learned. So I learned a ton there and so much so that I needed to take a year off just to get my life back together. That's my wife would openly admit

Speaker 2:

It's so draining. I bet when you're training

Speaker 3:

And you're not, you're not around people that are joyful, thankful, and humble and fun. It's none of that. And it's , it's just a really dark industry that being said, came out of that in 15, learned a lot, took a year off. So during that time I wasn't going to work every day . That was a perfect timing. Spell that Terry said, Hey, if you've got time, you know, can we just hop on a call once a week and help me build a plan and then hold me accountable to it. Cause he's a one man band. So he had nobody to even like his wife's like, she didn't know what was going on. So he , he basically just said, look, just hold me accountable. I think if any of us were coaching our kids or coaching a team who do we say is the most coachable player, a player that says, give me advice and hold me accountable. Not the third superstar, not if they score 15 goals, it's the player that says, give me advice and hold me accountable. Okay. And that's exactly what Terry asks. So like sure. We set up a call once a week. It was Thursday mornings at 10 o'clock. We literally spent, I think, 52 weeks on the phone, a couple of trips back and forth between Atlanta and Detroit played some golf. Did you know day-long planning sessions once a quarter now kind of the rest is history, but it was great. Cause I got , I got to know the investment. Clearly I got to live it for a year. So I knew where every skeleton was buried. I knew the opportunities that were in front of us. I knew some of the things that didn't work. It was much easier to go raise money when I could talk to the other investors and say, look , guys, I've been in this for a year. I'm not guessing. So it was easy, easier . So Brian, you want to mentor me? Hey, if you want to go on that ride, let's do it. But

Speaker 2:

I'm not kidding around, man. Let's do this. So, you know, it's really funny though. Like I've been interviewed by other podcasts and then they're like, how did you start? How'd you do whatever to me, that was like, my, my mentor early on in this world is somebody that has nothing with golf. It was somebody I'd met in a Facebook group. He's a very large influencer in gardening. Huge, huge, huge hit . Now he is, he was pretty big, but now he's like huge. I asked the same thing. I met with them . I asked him the same thing, which I'm asking you now. And I was like, Hey, you know, we had coffee one day and I was on vacation. I and him , I knew he lived in San Diego. I went and saw him. And I said the same thing. I was like, Hey, I was really excited. Right. I was like, oh yeah, it's influencer. And so I'm like, Hey, check out my website. You know what he did for three hours, he ripped my website apart. He told me how bad it was. He told me about a million different things. Right. And I left that when I left that meeting, I was not expecting that. I was like, oh my God. But someone actually takes time to tell you what's wrong with something that means they care. Right. And not to tell you, like, that's a huge deal. He's like, if you really want to do this, man, this is what you need to do. Right. And I was like, okay, that's the thing . I asked him like an hour, I texted him. I was like, Hey, thanks for coffee. Who mentor me? And he's like, oh, I can't, I'm too busy. I was like, okay, fine. And then like five minutes later, he texted me back again. And he's like, yeah, I'll do it. But that was like, the moment I look at my trajectory, like that was like, you know , I'll slow. And then it was like, boom, because I could go over to him and say, should I do this? No. Should I do that? Yes. They'll spend money on that. You know, like these little things that really help grow your brand. I got some questions for you. They're are not mine. This is the cool part about, about the live podcast . That people really the questions I , I might say guys right now, I like this live version because I have my own questions. I hate I'll hang out, whatever. But then when I have other people like participate, then like they have really good questions that I think the audience wants to know. Okay. So my buddy Corey, what's the starting price range for Gallway bay gear

Speaker 3:

Go sort of top end retail. There's there's obviously times that there's sales or if we're moving into a next iteration of a product, we'll do a warehouse sale or something. But yeah, the pants run about 1 99 and the jackets 2 99 normal price. Yeah . We're not going , I mean, we're not Galvin green up in the five hundreds, but we're definitely not going to be your, you know , Adidas, cheapy jacket or some off-brand. Um, we fit that. We fit that good strata in the middle that someone says, I actually do care about my gear and I'm willing to spend for

Speaker 2:

It. Yeah. You're not like rolls Royce expensive, super like it's affordable enough where it's like, if it's a tool as part of your bag, right. Or part

Speaker 3:

Of your well, and you think about it. If we were going to be in a retail environment, if you just use the general Keystone principle, which is you gotta mark it up a hundred percent, you take $299 jacket. It suddenly becomes almost a $600 jacket that doesn't change our dynamics at all. That's going to the retailer. When you look at prices in the store, you really have to start number one, cut it in half and then start looking at the real price. And that's why for us at 2 99, we'd say, we know we're delivering a crap ton of value to the end user because we're going straight to them and that's resonating .

Speaker 2:

Yeah. That's what people don't understand. Yeah. Right? Like people don't understand that when you see prices online, that's cheaper than what it would be in retail because retail takes 50%. I'm telling you right now or more. Right. So you got double whatever you see online. Right ? Yup . I didn't realize that. You know, so that's like gloves are $25 because they go retails 1250. But what , how much you need to buy in the glove for right. Like cut it in half again. They're probably buying it at $7 or $8, $10. Same thing with hats. You know what I mean? Like it's just, retailer has to get their fit a hundred percent essentially

Speaker 3:

What they do . They deserve it. Right. They've got , they've got risks . They got employees. They've got marketing and overhead. So I'm not knocking the retailers at all.

Speaker 2:

It works for everything we buy that's right. Food clothes. It was a matter like there's

Speaker 3:

Yep . We're, we're direct. We're a direct brand. And that has worked well for us. Again, we're we're coming up with innovations and product that we can do in three to six months that may take other brands because of their size two , two and a half years. Right? Exactly. They get into production cycles because of their volume and that they need to be in retail. I mean, just getting into a retail outlet as nine months onto your production cycle. Think about that. That's pretty crazy

Speaker 2:

That your product ahead of time, what you're going to make and buy , buy and sell it. Yeah. So anyway,

Speaker 3:

Sorry. That's probably off topic from the original question, but yeah . Well the smartest

Speaker 2:

Guys I know for reals like this dude's legit. I'm just, I'm just a goalkeeper. No, you weren't. You were a goalkeeper, but you're smart. This guy played professional soccer. So he's a really good goal at Google. It , his kids go to what ? Michigan, Michigan state ,

Speaker 3:

Michigan, and Michigan and Caltech. All

Speaker 2:

Right . Here's a question for you. When you say water repellent coding , does that mean it's a hundred percent waterproof or does that mean something else?

Speaker 3:

So if you look at our vest , it's water repellent coating. Cause not waterproof. So water will shut off, but obviously if you put it in an underwater, it's not going to be, but if you, any of our outerwear is a hundred percent waterproof,

Speaker 2:

It will fall on the ground. It will not go through and keep you wet.

Speaker 3:

Yeah. If you go to Galway bay golf.com, there's a lot of really good video imagery of people getting hammered with water and you can see it from a super close up view. A far away view. I went to a university of Michigan football game two years ago and it probably rained two inches in about 20 minutes. The water was literally pouring down the stairs. I had my Galway bay jacket on another guy had a zero restriction golf jacket. The rain stopped . It was like a huge thunderstorm stop . I ended up my jacket out on a yellow shirt or base, right. To be appropriate for years and Michigan, if you'd have seen a drop of water would look dark. It was completely dry. The other guy was fricking soaked through his jacket. Literally every seam had soaked through our stuff just works . It's

Speaker 2:

Like a tent, right? Like tents are waterproof, but they're not what sort of different water repellent. But if it rains a time, then it's probably got to like go through the seeds or whatever. But you guys won't, I'm just, yeah. The trick

Speaker 3:

Test is can you put water in a seam and hold it there? Right? Like a little comfortable because anybody can pour water. I mean, I could do with my Lulu lemon pants. Right. I can pour water against it. It's kind of fall off, but that's just gravity and the way the knit material lays, when you turn it sideways and put water there, it'll bead and then soak in. That's the difference?

Speaker 2:

Well , that's really cool at Galway bay is that like the sweat will get out. Right. So it doesn't turn into like a box . Yeah. Like not the joke Dutch oven . I know what you guys were thinking. Um ,

Speaker 3:

Even gases exit the membrane.

Speaker 2:

So anyways, this Google, if you don't want that, it's pretty funny. Okay . So then all the, like if you're not hot and sweaty and like muggy when you're wearing it, right? Like that's so freaking cool.

Speaker 3:

That took a long time because the original fabric back in 2010, 11 was a, one-directional it shed water like nobody's business, but didn't breathe. And that's one of the things we spent a lot of time. It's called hydro flex 32, it's three layers, but breeds two way. We just felt like that was the most important that, and it's a , it's a hard technology to do because it's number one, it's very expensive, super technical in nature. You can't just slap stuff together. There's a lot of care. And quite frankly, there's only three or four places in the world that can do it, getting into those production cycles, making sure you understand the thickness of materials. What's the feel like on the inside? I mean, things that not many people think about until they actually put it on, but to your point, you know, Hey, it just rain. I mean Michigan, but it's 71 degrees. Okay. What do I do now? Right? Or

Speaker 2:

It's I hate that feeling. Two-year-old hot, sweaty. And then like, Nope,

Speaker 3:

You would not, you'd not be sticking on the inside to argue.

Speaker 2:

What colors do you usually come with? Is it like black and blue? These are all questions people are asking.

Speaker 3:

Yeah. I mean, black and gray is pretty, pretty standard. I think in the industry, you try to stay neutral. We did a , we took a little bit of a leap of faith and did an old glory set. So kind of red, white and blue, red, or mostly blue with red trim and a white accents. It was for some people best colorway jacket that they'd ever found. And others were like, eh, you know, I'm not really into that. I'd look for something a little more neutral. We had some fun with it. We did it. So I think if you look at most neutral colors, it's going to be like our new set coming out in at the end of 21 , uh , starting 22, it's going to have some Sage black and Sage. And then we're toying with some burnt orange accents. Just some things that kind of make the jacket and the pants fun. But still something that if you said, Hey, I'm putting on a pair of jeans. I could wear this with it. And I don't have to worry about what's my shoe . That's our idea is it shouldn't be a jacket that you could only wear with one thing, because if that's okay ,

Speaker 2:

Look European, let's put it that way. Right? Yeah . Europeans like

Speaker 3:

The cut is

Speaker 2:

Coloring. Yeah. Coloring

Speaker 3:

Is not going to be loud and flashy. You know, again, our brand is, is basically that it's outerwear . You want to wear, not just one time or with one thing. So we use that as a north star for us. Like we really have to check ourselves to make sure that we're not doing something. You go, whoa, that's a race car. And we don't even want to host, you know ,

Speaker 2:

It's a race car,

Speaker 3:

A lot of guys like building race cars, you know, they put something in there . Don't

Speaker 2:

Want to wear it. And that's right . Mira , a funny story. One time I'm not to name the Ram , but one time I , um, I did a shoe company and they're like, Hey, please review these shoes. And I said, okay, fine. This is a long time ago. They're a very European shoe company. They're a European brand. Right. And so I reviewed a shoe. I gave it to them before I publish it. This is like a really long time ago. They came back to me and they go, oh, can we change the pictures out? I was like, why? Like, oh, we want , use our own pictures. I was like, all right, fine whatever. And so they like send me some pictures and I like every picture of like a European dude wearing their shoes. Right. And I'm like, we don't look like that in America. You know that. Right. Like they didn't care, but it was still kind of funny, but like, it was like, I would never wear that dude. Like that looks gross. Yeah. And that's

Speaker 3:

It's so off-brand right. So to , in Europe, that, to your point, that'd be a huge hit. But then that , that has to be your audience.

Speaker 2:

Like in Europe, Europe, not like England or like Ireland or something mainly in Europe. Yeah. It was just funny. I just thought it was funny. Cause it's like, you know what, dude, you gotta remember where you're coming from. Do you guys have a lot of sales in Europe or, or does like Galvin green? Have it locked down over there?

Speaker 3:

They're definitely the industry leader there without a doubt. I mean, that's how it is for them.

Speaker 2:

I was talking to Tom, my buddy, Tom he's the GM for north America. And he said that like GABA greens, the number one golf apparel brand in Europe, which I had no idea about that. Yeah . It was a marketing. He was like, no, like everything I'll be like, really? He's like, yeah. I also thought Gavin green was from Ireland that day, which are not they're from Sweden or something. Yup .

Speaker 3:

Yup . So I'm

Speaker 2:

A little , like a dumb. I was like, oh yeah, you guys from Ireland. He's like, no man , sweet . They sell

Speaker 3:

A lot in Ireland. But as they'll tell you, like he's in charge of north America until you get onboard here in north America, getting things shipped over is expensive and timely again, that might work in retail. So they have a year in advance for us. We don't. So we do a lot of sales in Europe. Uh , but again, it's direct and there are people that have said, Hey understand, there's going to be a 17% VAT tax. There's going to be shipping is probably double what it would be in the states, but we love your gear. And we want it. We actually do a lot of business with caddies in Ireland and England.

Speaker 2:

Let's see why not? Right? Like they want to say dry flavorable, right. Even at 2 99, not 600 bucks, you know? And that's like us. So imagine what it'd be like an English pounds, right? Like exactly. Somebody asked me, what is the thickness of a jacket? And especially the pants are lion pants fairly thicker or they like not as thick or are they all kind of the same thickness?

Speaker 3:

Uh , they're not the same. So the online pants are going to be probably less thick than a pair of hate to pick a brand, pick any golf slack. It's going to be the same. Right. They won't be thick like a knit pair of Lulu lemon pants. For sure. They're gonna be thinner than that. Our line pants are going to be just probably a little bit thicker than the normal, because the lining is actually just on the inside of that fabric. So it's not two pieces of independent fabric. It's actually the one , she says a warm liner on the inside that goes all the way down to like 37 degrees Fahrenheit. And then up to, you know, I'd be wearing those probably up into the high forties and then anything from kind of 45 to 70, I'd be wearing our online pant . And then north of 70, it just depends on, you know , if you're playing on a date , well like

Speaker 2:

Normal pants, they don't look like pants. You put on over your pants.

Speaker 3:

Right? Yeah. I probably should have worn a pair right now. But if I had them on and stood up, you can change the clothes, come back. You're so bossy. They're like regular pants. So the thickness,

Speaker 2:

That's crazy though. That's so cool. Because like you have to carry that with you and your bag. Like it's like you , weren't a big garbage bag, you know, and then you put the garbage bag off and put it in your bag. It's like, you're just wearing normal clothes, but you're not soaked . You know exactly . Now you gotta make some kind of shoe cover or something.

Speaker 3:

Maybe we've got some , uh , base layer stuff. That's going to be the expansion of our product lines . So as you'd imagine people have our gear and they say, well, the jacket's great, but it got really cold. And I ended up putting on a , an insert brand here, you know, something terrible or some base layer. I'm getting this. Did you guys have base layer? Do you have base layer? So we spent this last year really designing a really nice functional set of base layer. So you could wear the long Johns underneath. You could wear the base layer top under a golf shirt. Then with the jacket, we've got a zip up sort of like vest integrated into sleeves. I think we've taken a lot of consumer feedback from what they're looking for and done quite a bit of testing this next iteration into our product lineup is going to be really exciting because again, it's just stuff that you'd wear. No one would look at you and say, oh, you're heading straight to a golf course to basically do battle with the elements. It's like, wow , that looks really sharp. It looks like something you'd wear out to , you know, on a cool night in Scottsdale, you'd look really sharp. And at the same time, the next day, if it was, you know, 48 degrees or 50 degrees, like it gets in the desert. Sometimes you'd be wearing this stuff out to play golf. And then on zip and down to a base layer below the base

Speaker 2:

Layer, is that like a layer in itself or would it be like a layer where it's zipped in to the jacket?

Speaker 3:

It's a layer in itself. So it's basically a thermal layer that you'd wear either standalone under a quarter, zip, you know , Jack or quarters , zip top or under a golf shirt. And then you put the jacket on top of that. So it's kind of a way to layer in, you know, the old adage wear layers, not one heavy garment. It follows that very technical, keep you warm. It'll all be breathable and follow that mantra. So you're not going to put it on and feel like, oh my God, I just stepped into a sauna. You know, we want to make sure that you're warm, but playable .

Speaker 2:

Do they fit true to size or is it a little bit ,

Speaker 3:

Um , no, it's true to size. So if you're a , I'm an Xcel and Xcel fits me exactly like performance jacket. So I don't need to get go bigger or smaller. We spend a lot of time and it is sized for the U S so going back to European question, we have a European size and digitizing chart because that is different. How guys want the clothes to fit there , I'm generalizing a bit, but they want it to fit differently. We've specifically made it in the U S to say, here's how our brands fit here. We consider being in the American market. This is what we consider comfortable and you know , size appropriate. It's dialed into exactly that.

Speaker 2:

Hey, somebody asked . Yeah , cool. This is cool. But the live stream , this thing is fricking cool. I love this. Right? So you guys , this is Brian acting by the way. Oh

Speaker 3:

No. That's the guy we paid that looks a thousand times better than I

Speaker 2:

Do. And like really good. Yeah. I don't look like that. Jacket is that's cool jacket. Jacket's cool. I'd wear that jacket. Um , is it just for men or is it women too?

Speaker 3:

It's just for men. So that's been probably our next place to conquest to talk about that. Um, the challenge and go back to our first part of our conversation is you can't be everything to everybody. I think too many businesses try to do that. So we know that we've still got a long way to go just in the men's outerwear market. So for us, we've focused, refocus. Every dollar we make back into the men's apparel side. And until we say, Hey, we're crushing it there. Then we'll start talking about the next cool.

Speaker 2:

I mean, I'd where you guys could send me stuff. They're

Speaker 3:

Not overstated. Right? That's kind of the idea that it's got a little bit of an accent. You're going to look sharp, but it isn't something that you're screaming in on two wheels saying, look at me on a golf course.

Speaker 2:

See the regular pants. You guys like you would never know that the regular pants, right? Like ever, probably our

Speaker 3:

Number one most answered question, even though the website. Well, clearly the website doesn't do a good job of answering this if this is the question, but where are the rain pants? You know? Where are the, where's the it's like, no, this is it. This will , I see the slacks on there. But fabric is technical. It looks sharp. That's what it should be.

Speaker 2:

We're in different shoes in these pictures. And there's like old man shoes.

Speaker 3:

Well, yeah, that's a company decision.

Speaker 2:

It looks like old nurses outfit. Shoes. Yeah . Hey, did you want my opinion? Sorry. I mean, these are freaking cool. That's the hard part, right? Because you know, if you're going to switch your energy and start trying to make women's clothing too, that's a whole other ball of wax for right now. I mean, you , in the future, you probably will . Once you start having more market share and stuff like that, but it's like, you can't go in a million directions at once. That's the problem. Right? I learned that too. I was like, I'm going to make shirts. Right? Everybody remembers this. I made shirts. I have lots of shirts, but I was like, oh, I don't mean women's shirts. So when I got to make women's shirts and it's like, I know nothing about women's fashion. I know zero, right. I guess my wife, but she would never wear a golf shirt. She's gonna play golf. That's the hard part, you know, like gotta be good at one thing before we move to the next,

Speaker 3:

That's a philosophy, right? I mean, some people would argue the opposite and you know, put your toe in a lot of different buckets of water and see what sticks. We just know we have traction here and we've got a ways to go until we can say we're really dominating the market. And at that point, yeah, I would never rule out that we'll do women's stuff. The design company we use now is work with a lot of really big classy women's brands. So they've already started to get us thinking about, Hey, when you guys want to go there, we have some really good ideas, but then you're doubling the product line. You're doubling the design efforts. You're and there's a lot you're going to sell it. It's a D you said it before. It's a different market. Like men tend to be function over fashion for the most part. Right? Mean at the end of the day, it's got to have some good

Speaker 2:

Black and white with dudes, right.

Speaker 3:

Creating it sucked and it leaked. They're not going to buy it. And if it's a big garbage bag and it was a hundred percent waterproof, but it didn't let you play golf. You're not going to buy it. So, you know, we were sticking to that stitching. That's cool. The old glory is cool . Red , blue. I love the old glory. Me personally, but the white one is really, really sharp. That's a little blend of a European look.

Speaker 2:

Uh , yeah, but it's not like in your face European.

Speaker 3:

No, it's not. It's just from a, from a clean lines and a sharp and classy, right?

Speaker 2:

Yeah. That's a cool, sure. Well, let's share the name right above the shoulder. That looks very European to that kind of style. And the pageant , somebody asked a really good question. And they said, how would you change consumer mindset to pick Galloway bay over like Nike or under armor for base layers? That's a really good one . How would

Speaker 3:

I, that's a great question. How would I change mindset? Yeah.

Speaker 2:

I mean, that's a kind of any kind of product really to try because the big boys have all the money. And , uh ,

Speaker 3:

What I would say is if , um , for most people, this is, again, there's sort of this risk of universal statements and apparel doesn't work because my body type is different than yours, different somebody else. We're all different. I would say for the most part, the care that we've taken to make sure that it fits a golfers designed application. We're not designing base layer to go cycling, right? We're not designing base layer to make sure you're comfortable when you go fly fishing, because it works. Don't get me wrong, but Adidas and Nike, they sell it in the golf department. But trust me, when you go over the running group, aside from the thumb hole in the garment, it's the same exact garment. Yes. You're getting a good fat . I mean, they , they get access to some of the best fabrics in the world, but they're not the most expensive. They're not the most technical because that doesn't give them the best margins. Their business model is fantastic. I mean, you don't get to be brands like that without doing stuff. Right. So if you're looking for something a little more widespread fit, that's probably a place to go. If you want something, that's very golf performance focused. I think you're going to try our stuff again, whether it's a jacket, the long sleeve HyperFlex, the base layer, you're going to put them on and say, this was made by golfers for golfers. And I get it when I put it on. I feel that not for everybody, but I'd say 90% of the market. That's what we're going after. So for a person says, well, gosh, I couldn't, I couldn't use this to go skiing. I'd say, I think good, but just don't go. Don't go out on a negative four degree day to know that it wasn't designed for that. So hopefully that answers the question again, we're trying to stay in our lane and say for the people you have to,

Speaker 2:

Because you're going to just spin your wheels and spend a bunch of money and then which may or may not work. Right. And then before it's time, right? It's all about timing. Everyone's upset because the old glory jacket does not have a large right now. Sorry, guys, that's kind of a compliment. Cause I lost my jacket and they're like, oh man, they don't mean old glory than large. I know I'll

Speaker 3:

Be honest with you. We did a very limited run on that. Um, and it was, again, it was, it was polarizing either. People are like, this is the best thing I've seen or I'd never wear it. Welcome to fashion. You're not going to make everybody happy. We , we did an outing for a group up in Northern Michigan. I think it was 60 or 70 guys and they got a jacket for every dude. So cool. It looks so cool. We do a lot of business with golf courses who are doing like a member member or member guests where they're tired of giving away a wedge with a dozen golf balls. You know, the backpack is a nice fit because it's also waterproof, which is really cool. But I use it every day and it's my travel backpack. Every day it's made out of ballistic nylon, but a lot of places will go like a jacket, a vest in the backpack and that's their tea gift for their member guests. I see people that got that five years ago. It still looks great. And when we go out to the different events and be like, dude, this is the best thing I've had in, you know, a decades worth of member guests. And it's again, it's going direct. So they're not having to buy it from the retail locations. And then, you know, how do I do a $250 tee gift? You know, what do you buy them? Some small items, you know, a pair of cheap shoes or something you can, you can load up with us, which is pretty cool.

Speaker 2:

So all your sales are direct to consumer. You don't have any green grass.

Speaker 3:

Uh, we do have green grass, but it's direct to their members. So mostly it's that marketing for you. Yeah. So most places have mill river. So we just basically say, and just use general terms. Most are cost plus 10%. That's what the members typically go through. So our green grass is we'll work with the pro to make sure we still fit under retail, that they don't have to mark it up. And because they buy in volume from us, they can get a discount. So it was kind of a win-win right. Member gets awesome. Item pro still gets to make their 10% margin. And we don't have to play in the retail space, but we do get Greengrass presence. So like it ,

Speaker 2:

You should do like a thing where for pros and be like, oh, you use V1. You're going to get a blah, blah, blah. On the Galway bay.

Speaker 3:

Funny, you should mention that because we've looked at it, right? I mean we're in the business. It's expensive. And the return is tough because tell me the last time that you watched golf, when they were playing in the rain, that Galway bay would be, they don't usually do it because there's typically lightening in the area. They go to last year's coverage. There just isn't a lot of coverage for players playing in the rain.

Speaker 2:

Sorry . Yeah, you have to remember that. Like, Hey, they're still

Speaker 3:

Playing . And , and the big brands snipe these guys. So Nike will basically throw into a contract. Hey, by the way, you have to wear outerwear. That's true. Rory is never going to wear the outerwear. But on the one day that he is, he's got to throw on Nike stuff. But I will tell you a funny story. I don't know if you remember when Tony Romo was playing in the pebble beach. Pro-Am that he hit that flop shot off the hospitality deck. Oh yeah . Yeah. So he hits it to like three feet. Everybody's like, holy crap, this guy's unbelievable. Tony's dad loves Galway bay and it bought him a pair of our pants. He's wearing Galway bay pants. When he hit that shot, we didn't pay him a time. Right. But he's cause it was raining cats and dogs.

Speaker 2:

Yeah . And people's while wear nice stuff. Right? Like that does the job. And it's like, okay, now you have these conglomerate that jump in and be like, oh wait, wait, wait, wait, don't throw it in a one sentence. Outerwear, you know, in the contract, they don't forget it. They're gonna get paid billions of dollars. That's true. That's a hundred percent sure you and your story is a true story. My buddy owns a belt company. He was on the tour for a little bit in about the late to like 2008, seven ton run there. Like he was on the tour and one of his friends was who's also famous, was like, Hey, it'd be really cool. We had our own belts cause nobody had belt contracts. Right. Cause he wears a belt. And so he's like, you should make belts . That's what they're talking about. Like just hanging over there , playing around. He was like, oh , that'd be kind of cool. And so he built a belt . He's literally built a bill company. And like everyone was, were like, Ricky, everybody. I could find, find a website, show it to you. Like here's everybody on the tour literally wearing his belts by like 2012, 2013. Right. Because they're all his friends, he puts these guys. And so like these custom belts really cool. And then all of a sudden title us and tailor made everybody starts throwing the word belt and the contract and his like nobody. And so there'll be Corey's belts anymore. And they're like, I'm so sorry. Like I can't wear your belt even though I love your belt. I can't wear it because it's even against my contract , such bull crap dude. It's like,

Speaker 3:

It's a tricky side of the business. Right? Because golf probably like NASCAR's the most aspirational of all product drivers. You know , that's why these guys have a Titlest bag. Even if maybe they're not playing Titlest when you look in the bag , um, it's about brand aspiration. And as consumers we see it and that's what we want to do. So it's , it's an expensive place to play and we're definitely not big enough to , to have to go buy it. But when guys wear us , um, exciting as hell because they chose to chose to wear it . Exactly. That's the difference.

Speaker 2:

That's the biggest compliment in the whole wide world that they would choose you over, you know, whatever it might be. It doesn't really have , see, this is a thing too . It's like , do consumers really watch golf and be, oh, Rory has a title , his bag. I should get that bag. I mean maybe cause on TV, but I mean,

Speaker 3:

It would say it does, but who controls the data, the marketing companies and who is charging the brands to place the market . Right? It's, it's a, it's an interesting business. If you really get into the underpinning of it and number one, we're not big enough. And I'd say for V1 , which we are big enough, we still choose not to play there. We'd rather, we'd rather be with 15,000 golf pros or use our stuff to actually teach and make a living. And four plus million consumers that choose our stuff without us having to be plastered everywhere. You know? So

Speaker 2:

All the time I hadn't realized that. I mean with golf until like I went to the PGA show and I was like, holy crap,

Speaker 3:

You get it front and center there. For sure.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. And I was like, Hmm , that's weird. I liked the small and midsize brands because I liked, I was thinking they're cool. Right? I mean the larger brands are , it's kind of interesting. I find like the European brands are pretty cool. The Japanese brands are cool when you use the United States. That's how much they want to. They just have their ways of doing stuff. Like the big ones, the big

Speaker 3:

Ones. Yeah. We're 30 million person market. Right? You look at golf, 25 to 30 million people in the golf market. That's not very big. It's less than 10% of our us population. So if you take golf as a relatively small ecosystem in the United States, you got to do some pretty bland, far reaching products to make sure you cover that market set versus European Japanese, any APAC country, they've got hot pockets around and they can go right into those pockets and do some really cool, innovative things, because they're just working in those elements, right? They're not trying to cover sort of mass territory with small market.

Speaker 2:

You guys should go. You guys should spend a bunch of energy. This is what I've heard. Even you prioritize doing it because partly , no , this is that Japan is like blowing up in golf right now. Like blowing up. I've heard from people that like some of the big retailers that the club com retailer , the club companies are making all their money this year in sales, on call clubs in Japan and Korea. Like then the United States essentially what's happening.

Speaker 3:

Interesting. There is V1 doing very well there. The club manufacturer is doing very well. Their ball companies, not so much apparel companies, not so much. And the reason being when, when you go to really anywhere APAC , but I'd say for sure, China and Japan, and you say, Hey, let's go play golf. You go to a driving range. They typically have a personal suite that they've paid for, which is kind of like their bay. It's got tea , it's got some soccer , maybe some couches, and then you go hit it. It's almost like a top golf if you will, but you own the suite . So you're never playing in bad weather. There's a little heater in there. It's always 70 degrees. You're not buying different apparel, which is so interesting. But you're using a new balls or balls because you're using the facilities. Yeah . So you're using the clubs for sure. And they definitely are looking okay. I want to record my swing. I want to analyze my swing, the technology, for sure. But on the apparel side, it's really interesting. Not many can afford , uh , on a regular basis go actually out to the golf course. So when they play guys, that is it super expensive. It's super, super expensive and very limited in scope. So if you look at the number of courses available, based on the population that plays it's supply and demand would just tell you around a golf is like three to 500 bucks and

Speaker 2:

Oh yeah . Cause there's like a YouTube CHAM and watching , uh , watching. Cause I don't understand Japanese, but like there's a YouTube channel. I know it was called, it's a bunch of characters. Right. And they get like, it's like five or six people and they're in Japan I think. And they kill it. Like everyone, their episodes, they get like a million views. It's just playing around a golf, like it being silly and whatever. And I was like, what the heck, man? Like, you know, like , this is probably why. Right. Cause people like, oh, they get to get the , you know, and they'll bring like famous people in Japan. Right. Whoever they are. And so like, it was pretty cool to watch, but you know , it makes more sense now because it's like, it's almost like a luxury, right? Like, oh, I'd love to go play whatever, you know, and here it's like, we just play wherever we want whenever we want. I never knew that. That would make sense though . I want to have bag sell pretty well over there. Probably rice to go fancy

Speaker 3:

And your bag . Yeah. I know. I knew the guys that , uh , at home , uh , golf, which obviously they're , they're an APAC companies . So , um, but they're , they have some golf bags itself for $10,000, which is crazy. Oh , oh yeah. They've got sets of golf clubs that are 50, $60,000, 24 carat , uh , embossed , really ? Like we we'd say Gotti. Right. But in the Japanese culture, it really is a sign of status. And so, yeah . Right . That's a fancy golf bag with these really shiny golf clubs. And it's a , it's an interesting market.

Speaker 2:

It's like the guy that rolls up at the golf course and he acts like, he's all decked out in all the new gear and all the new stuff. And then he like gets the first tee box and he drops it and you're like, that's what I thought.

Speaker 3:

Well , a lot of them don't actually played those clubs. Like those are the ones that sit in their suite , but they're , they're a trophy. And then they actually play like a version of those clubs that are $5,000. Yeah. That's pretty amazing.

Speaker 2:

What the heck, man, we're in the wrong business.

Speaker 3:

I could have told you that man being in golf is fun, but

Speaker 2:

Uh , yeah. It's a fun hobby, fashion, personal yachts and airplanes. No way you should go into like something else. Like I dunno .

Speaker 3:

It wouldn't be as it wouldn't be as fun I've been there.

Speaker 2:

It's golf. I don't think it is stuff seriously. Honestly. I really don't. I mean, it's, it's all it is. Like whatever, you know. Well, I think all the way bays . Cool. I got you guys sent me some stuff. I haven't used it yet. Why should I use it now? Cause it's raining.

Speaker 3:

You get some rainy season stuff.

Speaker 2:

It's pretty legit. And I liked it. It's over here, opened it up already, but I mean the price points right on, I think, and I didn't realize that it's not outerwear . Like, you know, I , when I thought about it, I was like, oh, is this the kind of like, you know, when you go hunting or do you go out in the woods or something and you have like that pull over pants, you don't get all wet. I was like, oh , it'd be hot as hell. I didn't realize it was like just a pair of pants or Jack A. Little jacket, the jacket, but still yep , exactly. That's for them sick. And then what do you guys have any big things coming out, like in the next, by the holidays? Or like do you think coming up or what?

Speaker 3:

We're starting to unleash some of the holiday colors, which , um, you'll you'll see. I wouldn't say it's groundbreaking from what's new and out there, but definitely in 20 end of 21, beginning of 22, as we get into the spring season of 22, all of our base layer elements will be out. And I'd say, you know , if you're already a fan of Gallway bay, I mean, our pre-orders are crazy right now. And if you haven't checked, that's awesome. Yeah. That's great. I mean, it's , we have a very, very loyal user base and that's the other thing is that we don't, our cost of acquisition per customer is probably a fraction of what other big brands have to spend when we get somebody. We just, they stay with us and we've got guys, who've had three, four iterations of our pants, you know, they're , they're worn out around the edges or whatever it is. And which is, we just love hearing those stories because it means it didn't sit in their closet and only get used twice a year. And these guys are using our gear, which is awesome. And they just come back cause they know they can trust it. If for whatever reason, the size isn't right, or one brand, a pant we made three years ago, there was a problem with the Bartec on the back pocket that like every 10th pair, it would rip the back pocket. If someone said I've got the rip, it didn't matter if they own them for a year, a month, whatever. We said, send them back. We sent them a brand new pair with a gift card on top of it. They just know they can trust us. Like we always make it right. You know , we don't always get it right. But we always make it right.

Speaker 2:

That's all it matters. Right. Somebody wants to know as we're going to any big sales this year for black Friday a hundred percent. So yeah ,

Speaker 3:

We'll be doing , uh , go to the website and sign up for the newsletter because it's our inside the ropes group. And so I will say Mike Brown who runs Galway bay from a day-to-day perspective really does a fantastic job. This is not just a lip service newsletter. We really do try to make the guys make it, worth it for the guys who sign up with us, product testing, free gear, definite heads up on sales before they come. So like when those largest we're getting ready to blow out on the old glory, we sent a note out to our inside group, which completely cleaned us up . Cause the guys were like, oh, I don't want to wait around till the very end. Yeah. So it's always nice just to kind be in the know, but for sure, black Friday is a big, big time for us.

Speaker 2:

Great. So you probably should go into sales. You just saw somebody sign about an email list. That's like the hardest thing in the world because I

Speaker 3:

Would do it myself. Right. Again, if I don't want to find it for list, if all you're going to do is just include

Speaker 2:

Me like every other social

Speaker 3:

Media posts you do. But if you, if you make it so that I do get inside track information and every now and then, Hey, we're thinking about doing this new flex vest . We have no idea if we're going to produce it. We've got some salesman samples. First three guys that are wearing a medium, large, extra large penis . We ship the gear out and all we ask , you know, you keep it. But all we ask you just give us feedback. People love that stuff. And it's great for us. Right. So that stuff, I signed up for it . I enjoy it .

Speaker 2:

Well, yeah. Cause you get into honest it's honesty. Right. And that's what you want. Like

Speaker 3:

We'll send feedback, which is like, if you guys ever make this you're going bankrupt. So it's like, yo yeah. We've, we've come up with some really good stuff that made no sense at all. Yeah . It's great

Speaker 2:

To get the all kinds of, I, I , I'm not gonna tell you on air, but I'll tell you all kinds of things I would never do again, like never. Yeah . I have a respect for certain things now I'd never had before I get a lot of those, like I'm the guy. So like, if someone's like, oh my something broke or whatever, I was like, all right, I'll send you another one, whatever, you know, like what am I going to do? I don't Brian affinity really is my friend. I feel like I've known him for a long time. He's super cool. Super laid back. Super, super, super smart. You know, you guys need to check out Galway bay because I learned a lot today. I didn't realize that it was as cool as it is. I mean, honestly, because you know, hearing it from the man's mouth, but how it works and technology, just everything, I don't know. You want support brands like that. So thank you for being on the show. I will talk to you guys in the next episode.

Speaker 3:

Yeah. And guys, I will say, you know, Paul, you know, this is true about me. I'm easy to get ahold of. So brian@galwaybaygolf.com . If you check something out and say, why did you do this? Or I have an idea for that. You know, that that's how we get better. Hopefully you've got that from, you know , the Q and a Paul, just Paul. And I just went through , uh , we love feedback, right? It's , it's really what makes us great

Speaker 2:

And sports too. Like, you know, you guys, we

Speaker 3:

Do the same thing, right? It's the same, the same values, the same mission. I always say leadership starts at the top. So if I'm not walking the walk, you know, awfully hard for everybody else below that to , to follow in line. So yeah.

Speaker 2:

That's awesome. Well, thank you again. Thanks for everybody who on the live chat. I really appreciate it because you guys make it more fun. Ask really good questions that I'm not even thinking about. Cause I'm trying to just think about yourself . So thank you. I will see you guys in the except sewed .

Speaker 1:

Thanks for listening to another episode of behind the golf podcast. You're going to beat me, go stay connected on and off the show by visiting golfers authority.com. Don't forget to like subscribe and leave a comment. Golf is always more fun when you're winning , stay out of the beach and see you on the green .