Behind the Golf Brand Podcast with Paul Liberatore

#73 - Fujikura Golf Shafts: Spencer Reynolds (Brand Manager)

April 25, 2022 Paul Liberatore Season 3 Episode 73
Behind the Golf Brand Podcast with Paul Liberatore
#73 - Fujikura Golf Shafts: Spencer Reynolds (Brand Manager)
Show Notes Transcript

We made it to Episode 74 of the Behind the Golf Brand Podcast.  In this week's episode, I interview my good friend Spencer Reynolds, Brand Manager for Fujikura Golf Shafts. 

Since their inception in 1995, Fujikura Composites America has been at the forefront of design and development to produce the world’s best golf shafts.  Their mission is to bring joy to all golfers by improving their game and maximizing their potential.  

When looking at Fujikura Driver Shafts, it's clear that they are the cutting edge in shaft design. Their shafts are known to be the spin killers in the golfing world, and their graphite shafts are great for adding distance to your game as well as accuracy. Superior carbon fibers in the Fujikura Driver Shafts offer many benefits. Using premium materials allows Fujikura shafts to add weight in just the right areas for maximum benefit. Using the right golf driver shaft for the perfect swing is what it's about in this game. And, Fujikura graphite Shafts allow for increased club-head speed to get the distance and low ball spin you are looking for every time.

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Today we play golf.

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Let me show you how we do it in the pros.

Speaker 3:

Yeah . Welcome to behind the golf brand podcast. I never missed with the seven iron a conversation with some of the most interesting innovators and entrepreneurs behind the biggest names in golf. My

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Friends were the golf clubs. I lived on the golf course. I lived on the driving range

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From pro. You

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Should learn something from each and every single round you

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Play to fun from on and off the green.

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Why would you play golf? You don't play it for money. Just

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Let me put the ball in a hole. This is behind the golf brand podcast with Paul liberatory.

Speaker 7:

What's up guys, Paul from golfers authority. Welcome to the behind the golf brand podcast. This week. I have my good friends , Spencer Reynolds from Fuji URA , which I am really excited to talk to 'em because I love Fuji Cru shafts . They make some of the best chefs out there as you guys already know, this is kind of cool to see, like behind the scenes at Fuji URA . What they're up to , um , I'll tell you right now. I love the vent to the shaft. I'm gonna put that on record. So without further ado , welcome to the show.

Speaker 8:

Thanks man. Thanks for having me, Paul. Good to be here.

Speaker 7:

So where are you at? Are you at the studio? Looks like it . What is that

Speaker 8:

Behind you ? Yeah. I'm I'm coming to you , uh , live from the Enzo studio here at , uh , Carlsbad HQ.

Speaker 7:

That's cool. What are those things behind you? What is that thing? A cameras or

Speaker 8:

Something? Cameras system, baby. That's what makes Enzo Enzo.

Speaker 7:

Really?

Speaker 8:

Yeah. 10 <affirmative> high speed motion capture cameras. Uh , that's kind of the heart and soul of it. And we analyze everything in a golf swing that you can possibly imagine regarding SHA performance. And it's a , it's an analytic dream come true.

Speaker 7:

<laugh> it looks fricking sick. I like, I mean, all I can see is that behind it . I'm like, well , that looks pretty dangerous. Yeah. Yeah. I be like a YouTube in all , like going really fast in it. I

Speaker 8:

Don't know . That's right. That's right. It just looks like a lot of expensive stuff you don't wanna break is what it really looks like. Yeah.

Speaker 7:

You're afraid to touch it. Yeah .

Speaker 8:

You

Speaker 7:

Call it down here. I broke it and then they're like, it wasn't that Spencer. Absolutely. So, so you're in Carlsbad, right? Headquarters. Mm-hmm <affirmative> um, now like what I usually like to do on the show is ask people kind of like, are you, are you a golf pro or are you just a normal duty plays golf?

Speaker 8:

I would say definitely more. The latter. I am not a golf pro in fact , uh , I would describe my, my entry way into golf as just sort of, I , I stumbled into it. It's been the best stumble of a ever had in my life, but it , it was not, it was not like the childhood dream or anything like that. It was just kind of a , a cool series of circumstances that led me to where I am. And so I'm definitely just a guy who loves golf and , uh , loves to play golf.

Speaker 7:

So where did you grow up?

Speaker 8:

Well , I'm originally from Texas hand handle of small town called Amarillo. Yeah .

Speaker 7:

That I've been there.

Speaker 8:

Yeah. Yeah. Uh , right at the tip of the state. Um , and then I went to ,

Speaker 7:

I'm actually going there next month. You're going a

Speaker 8:

About that . Are you gonna Texas ?

Speaker 7:

I'm going Amarillo.

Speaker 8:

I didn't know anyone . Amarillo on purpose. That's wild.

Speaker 7:

Well , that's usually like a , that's like a gas stop usually when you're trying drive across country. Um , there's some canyon there, like some famous canyon, like P right . What's what's it called?

Speaker 8:

P canyon.

Speaker 7:

Yeah. I'm going there in April.

Speaker 8:

That's a good time, man .

Speaker 7:

On a big Jeep trip, like with a bunch of people. Is it cool? My friend's like, it's really cool. Cool . You need to go. It's

Speaker 8:

It's a lot of fun. It's like, this is it like a big canyon behind the grand canyon? It's a

Speaker 7:

Real , it's like , I never even knew it even existed.

Speaker 8:

Yeah. It's a lot of fun. It's just outside Amarillo. It's a blast dude. It's really good hiking. And it it's you'll have a good time. Is

Speaker 7:

It gorgeous? I mean , it's really pretty .

Speaker 8:

It's really pretty.

Speaker 7:

How big is it ? It's really must be huge. Right? It's pretty massive. After grand canyon.

Speaker 8:

It's pretty massive. You've gotta do there's uh , there's there's a few kind of like natural monuments ish, but one of the trails you gotta do, you gotta do the lighthouse hike, which , uh , kind of goes up to its lighthouse shape rock structure. It's about a three hour . Hike's cool . It's

Speaker 7:

Dope. I'm so stoked. You gotta do it. You should come with me. You should go visit your

Speaker 8:

Family a little local knowledge show you around . Yeah.

Speaker 7:

You give the tour guide you back into the left is lighthouse rock

Speaker 8:

To your line . Left is more shrubs to your right . Is more shrubs .

Speaker 7:

I did a Jeep trip like two years . Well , it was probably three years ago. It was post COVID or pre COVID . We went to , um , OAB and Mo Moab was sick too. That's awesome. Um, and so my buddy moved to St. Louis like two years ago and he is like, it's halfway between St. Louis and Phoenix. Let's just meet there. So we're going umbrella . I think it's like 16 hours, a long drive.

Speaker 8:

Dude. That's a track dude, but you'll have fun. It's gonna be a good time.

Speaker 7:

So you grew up in Amarillo. What does there doing Amarillo oil?

Speaker 8:

Uh, yeah. You know , ranching. Yeah, a little bit. Um, we were kind of a grew up. My dad was an engineer, so we were not like the, the oil or ranch family. We were just kind like a regular sort of,

Speaker 7:

You know , kind of engineer.

Speaker 8:

He's an electrical engineer. So he is just, that's cool . He's just a total nerd. I love him with all my heart, but he's a total nerd. Um ,

Speaker 7:

<laugh> he says the guy with a thousand blight cameras behind him. Yeah.

Speaker 8:

Right. It's funny . Isn't that funny? So like , uh , we , he actually makes that joke all the time. Like when I grew up , uh , I hated math. Like I'm just not a math guy at all. And um, then when I got into club fitting, it's essentially just all analytics and math.

Speaker 7:

So fun math, right?

Speaker 8:

I'm the , well, I'm the only golfer in my family. Like the ones. Yeah. No one else plays golf. It was , it was just a very me thing. And, and so when I was explaining the job to my dad, he was like, so basically you just look at numbers all day. And I was like, whoa , kind of . And he's like, so it's basically just math. And I was kind of like, yeah, he's

Speaker 7:

All proud. He's

Speaker 8:

HES like this proud pop of moment. Right.

Speaker 7:

And like, no, dad, this has nothing to do with you. Stop . Yeah.

Speaker 8:

Uh , but no. So , uh , I grew up in Amarillo and, and I got, I got the golf bug relatively late in life. I mean, I played a little bit , um , here and there with some friends, but like, because no one in my family played golf. We weren't, you know, like there was no country club membership. There was no like playing golf with your dad and father, you know, I was just, no one played golf, my family. So , um, I didn't get into it really until I went to college. And one of my roommates in college was, was really into, it,

Speaker 7:

Went to college.

Speaker 8:

I went to Texas tech. So I went down to Lubbock . Yeah.

Speaker 7:

What year was that?

Speaker 8:

Let's see, that was oh three. That was oh three to oh seven. Yeah. Seems not that far away

Speaker 7:

There you are just get over it.

Speaker 8:

Not that old. Come on, man. I'm getting old.

Speaker 7:

That was like 18 years ago, bro. You'd have a kid. If you had

Speaker 8:

A kid, it was just the other day don't don't

Speaker 7:

Dude . I was , I went to Purdue and when I went there, like I was there when drew Brees was like a redshirted freshman, like he was in my classes and I'm like now was retire in the NFL. Like you really feel old then . And you're like,

Speaker 8:

You beat me. Congratulations. You're old. <laugh> . Uh , but yeah, my roommate at the time and a , and a good friend of mine was really into golf and he kind of taught me how to play. And then like most people to get into golf. I just got into it like aggressively. I was just like really, really quickly. It was a lot of fun. I just dug it. I thought it was a blast. Um, I really liked just , uh, uh, I'm kind of an outdoors type of guy. I like to be outside. And , uh, it was just so hard and uh , I'm , I get really competitive and determined about things. So it's like the perfect mix of being outdoors and doing something that drives you. Absolutely crazy that you're just obsessively, trying to get better at, to this day, still obsessively, trying to get better at , uh , so I just really took to it. And um, then when I grappled

Speaker 7:

You fell in love with it, right? Yeah.

Speaker 8:

Everybody does. It's it's just, it's weird. I it's a weird sport, man . It just can really capture some people. And um, I'm sure most people listen to this podcasts are on the same wavelength. If they're listening to something called behind the golf brand, they're probably in the golf <laugh> I think a lot of people can relate <laugh>

Speaker 7:

I know, right?

Speaker 8:

Yeah. So that was college. And then when I graduated, I graduated in oh seven and it was a really out , a great time to be finding work in advertising and marketing in 2007, the economy was, was really, really struggling garbage . It was

Speaker 7:

Like

Speaker 8:

Dead. Yeah. It was especially in the advertising marketing world. Like that was just not a spend . Most people were looking to invest in. Um,

Speaker 7:

So how old were you like 22. 23, right?

Speaker 8:

Yeah. About 22 , I guess it was , um , got

Speaker 7:

A college there's no job,

Speaker 8:

No jobs, because

Speaker 7:

So your butcher degree was in marketing.

Speaker 8:

Yeah. Advertising in marketing. And, and when I , um, uh , I , I kind of stayed in Lubbock for a little bit. And then my sister at the time was living in Austin. She actually still lives in Austin and now the whole family's relocated Austin, but at the time it was just her and, you know, she kind and I said, well, I don't think you're gonna find a job in , in a small market, like Lubbock, you probably got at least a better shot in a bigger city. And I was kind of done with school and looking to move. So I moved down to Austin and it was actually her idea, ironically, I guess we can blame my sister for all this. It was actually her idea. Um , when I was looking for an advertising job, she said, well , why don't you just get a job at a golf course? Like you're really into golf. Why don't you just do that? You know, it won't be like, you're

Speaker 7:

Make some money. It's not, yeah .

Speaker 8:

Some health insurance make some money, you know, do your thing. Right. So that's what I did. So I lived on the Southwest side of town of Austin and there was a , a private club called Austin golf club that was out in Spicewood, Texas, which is west of town. And they just randomly had, I saw that they had an opening for just kind of like, you know , member support member services. I went in, I , so

Speaker 7:

You were just cleaning clubs in

Speaker 8:

Other words. Yeah. Cleaning clubs, parking cars, you know, washing carts, picking the range. Like the usually yeah ,

Speaker 7:

No, man , I that's a cool me . I didn't ,

Speaker 8:

You know , and , and it was never like supposed to be this long term thing and I've been there. I've been there for, you know, a month or so. And I was , I was talking to the , uh, the pro at the time and he was just like, what , what are you doing here? Why are you just like hanging out washing carts? You know, he kinda like college degree, like what , what , what's the deal like? And I said, well, you know, I kind of gave him the same story I gave you. And he's like, no, no, no, like let's let the truth .

Speaker 7:

Yeah. You're like, yeah.

Speaker 8:

He was like, no , no, let's get you in the golf shop. Let's uh , let's , uh , kind of broaden this a little bit. Let's get you some time behind the counter. And, and so I did that for a while . And then , uh , he actually came to me and said, do you have any interest in being, you know, like a golf pro one day? I said, well, to be honest, not really , um , <laugh> not to not to knock it. I just like was for me. And , um , I said, honestly, like go

Speaker 7:

To school and do all that stuff.

Speaker 8:

Right. You know, do the whole PGA program and, and just become an assistant professional and go head professional. And I said, so, you know, for me, I'm much more interested in the business side of golf. Um , but on the green grass side, I am very interested in the club fitting side of things. I think that's a really cool area . Um, as a aspiring player, someone that's trying to get better, I really appreciated the value of club fitting. And I thought that was a really cool section of the industry. And it was kind of niche, even more niche at the time. It's very mainstream now, but at the time it was something people were definitely doing, but it wasn't, you know, kind of the default everyone's gonna get fit. Right. So he was like, okay, well , we've got a guy on our property that is a Titleist top 100 fitter. And why don't you roll down there and see if, if he needs some help. So that's when I met my good friend, Ryan Chrysler and , uh, he was on board and he goes, I'll tell you what, dude. Um, I know you gotta work 40 hours a week on the course and in the shop, but every minute you're not in the shop, I'll teach you everything. I know about club fitting <affirmative> . So we kind of started up a little partnership together and we tagged teams and fittings for about , uh , three years. So there's about a three year stretch where I worked about 60 hours a week , um, which was a , a lot, but it was cool because I learned a lot and

Speaker 7:

You had a lot of fun.

Speaker 8:

It was a blast. I really enjoyed doing it. And while I was there , uh , because it was a Titleist exclusive facility, I got to meet a lot of cool people at Titleist and make some good connections there. And then lo and behold, there was a job that popped up at Titleist at the , uh , Oceanside test facility where, where TPI is, and they were hiring for a , a product tester. And I threw my hat in the ring and, and I got the nod and, you know, moved out to Canada . Why

Speaker 7:

Do you think you got the nod because you knew what you were doing and you make good relationships.

Speaker 8:

Yeah. It's, it's an interesting role , uh , product testing. You , you gotta have a really good feel for , uh, you know, having a fitting background and a really good understanding of the golf swing is, is super important , uh , because you have to, you have to understand how to interpret numbers, right? So it's really easy. Just look at a screen and say, okay, it's doing X, Y , Z , but to really give valuable feedback to an R and D team, you've gotta be able to, you know, discern why is the club doing what it's doing? Is this player impact? Is this, you know, is, is the player affecting the golf club , uh , more so one way or the other, is it just the golf club that's , that's causing these for performance changes, things like that. So again, it kind of gets back to that really data weird analytical mathematical mixed with, you know, different player types. So it was, it was a unique position. And , um, I , so there's

Speaker 7:

Factors, right? Like you can't just look at the numbers and be like, oh, it's cause the shaft is being weird. It's like, no, the swing was changed . Totally . Something happen . Like it's not all things were equal. Right? Yeah . And you can look at this, it's like, you have to understand what's happening in the swing to be like, oh, I did this because of that a hundred percent connected to , and be like , oh , I that's actually okay. Because of what he did over here

Speaker 8:

A hundred percent . Yeah. Yeah. And then , and then you're , you're , you're testing clubs with , with amateur players, even better amateurs, but , um , you know, nobody's, nobody's a robot.

Speaker 7:

Yeah.

Speaker 8:

Yeah . We're not able to environment and choose . Right. Right. So it was a , it was a really great position. Um, had a blast there. It was a whole lot of fun. I mean , um , when I was ,

Speaker 7:

So what year did you move out to California then?

Speaker 8:

That was 2011.

Speaker 7:

Okay, cool.

Speaker 8:

Yeah. And that's, that's one of those jobs where people ask you what you do and, and you tell 'em what you do for a living. And they, they say one of two things, they either say, there's no way that's a real job. Right. Or number two, which is how can I get that job? <laugh>

Speaker 7:

So , which , yeah. Which PO which, which , uh, camp are you in?

Speaker 8:

Yeah . Yeah. It's just everyone that , uh , I knew that played golf was kind of just like, I don't , I Don understand, like, they're , they're paying you to watch people hit golf balls all day. It's like, well , yeah ,

Speaker 7:

Kinda . Yeah.

Speaker 8:

How , how do I get in on that ? But what what's funny is like kind of a little bit of backstory is when I got really into golf , um, you know, especially since there was the Titleist connection there with, with , uh , the club that I worked at , um , I got really interested specific in , in short game and put , uh , putting became kind of this big sort of pet project passion for me. So , um, I started following the guy to Cameron brand really closely and met a lot of really cool people in the kind of Cameron collector circle, people that collected putters and people that were just like total putter, putter nuts heads,

Speaker 7:

Putter.

Speaker 8:

Oh yeah. And , and it was a blast, man. I got, I , I went in full bore head first . I learned everything I possibly could and, and talked to everybody I possibly could. And it was real, real passion kind of, kind of side . So

Speaker 7:

Why did , why did that interest you so much?

Speaker 8:

I , I really too . Yeah. I just loved the artistry of it. I thought it was really cool that there was, there was a brand out there , um , taking the science of putting series , but integrating a lot of really like awesome artistic concept behind it. I really just thought that was unique and cool. And, you know, it's kind of like an advertising marketing guy. I , I , uh, I'm always, I'm always really drawn to, you know, branding and logos and graphics and things like that. So , um , that was sort of Scotty Cameron's awesome recipe was he always had these really inspiring and cool things to look at. Um, and things that were fun to collect and talk about and be a part of. And so it was, it was definitely this cool, cool side project. Uh , but the reason I bring that up is because when I was, when I working at , at TPI, it was right around the time that Scotty Cameron was building the fitting studio in the gallery in Encinitas. And , uh, my boss at the time came to me and he said, Hey, you know, there's probably a potential down the road that they might be looking to add some putter fitters or some staff, you know, is that something you'd be interested in? And I was like you , yeah, for sure. You know , definitely. So, you know, fast forward about a year or so. And the gallery opened down in Encinitas and I met with the people over at the putter studio and , uh , interviewed for a job there as a putter fitter. And, and , and I got the gig. So I went from testing clubs to fitting putters. So it was, it was kind of like this weird, like sort of dream come true , full circle deal, where you go from being, just reading about this stuff and in golf forums and kind of , you know, get your little collection on the wall to being like, you know, working there. It's , uh , it's just

Speaker 7:

In it . Yeah.

Speaker 8:

It's like being right in it. It's a

Speaker 7:

Trip. Yeah. Right place at the right time with the right interests.

Speaker 8:

Yeah. It's I tell anyone in the golf business, just like anyone in , I think, any in , when people are trying to get into it, it's just a whole lot of hard work and a , just a whole lot of luck, you know, it's just, it's just, you gotta do the work, but there's just this element of just having to be in the right place at the right time. And things just kind of lining up for you, you know , generally speaking, the harder you work, the more the opportunity for those things to line up. But there is, there's absolutely an element ,

Speaker 7:

But it's also the passion and like the more hard work you do and like the interest and like having people and seeing those people, seeing you have an interest in what they do totally . Like not like passive. And it's like, oh yeah, I like what you do. It's like, no, you don't, you're just trying to a

Speaker 8:

Job. <laugh> right . Yeah, totally. It's true. It's true. So , um, I was at the gallery for , um , for a while , a little over three years, I think. And then I moved , uh , to our corporate office , uh , with Titleist to work on , uh , fitting programs. Um ,

Speaker 7:

Did you wanna do that or did

Speaker 8:

You just, I did, yeah. It was a , it was kind of, it was time.

Speaker 7:

Yeah.

Speaker 8:

It was a good transition. It was , it was kind of getting a little bit away from actual fitting and a little more into sort of business and program management, which is something I, you know, definitely have a keen interest in and, you know, it was a good opportunity.

Speaker 7:

It's like, you're learning as you go up. Right. Like totally .

Speaker 8:

You

Speaker 7:

Literally started like the lowest possible level. You can probably start, which I think is cool. You know, like you worked in clean carts and then you went mm-hmm <affirmative> and you did, they gave you opportunity, right? Like somebody saw that the time to get to know you and be like, this is not your job. Right. And then they gave you an opportunity and then you gave you opportunity, you know? And it's like, because you were interested in what you were doing, but you had never thought 15 years ago that you would ever be doing in this job.

Speaker 8:

No, no, it's, it's, it's awesome. And , um, you know, the , I had a lot of really great friends still do at Titleist , really supportive group of people that gave me some great opportunities and helped me get to where I am today and, and very appreciative of that. Um, and then , uh , I landed myself over here at Fuji Kura about six months ago, and I'm having the time of my life.

Speaker 7:

So, so with title list , lemme ask this question to you . Cause I don't really know. So like they just use other people's shafts. Right. Like we all know that they don't make their own shaft. Like they have to use whomever. Right. Correct. Fuji ARA , whoever they , whoever. Right. Mm-hmm <affirmative>, mm-hmm <affirmative>. So in that, so then how'd you get on over to Fuji URA ?

Speaker 8:

Well, there was a really unique job opening actually. And , um, uh, what's what's you make a good point about , uh , OEMs, right? They are somewhat dependent on, on shaft companies to produce their shafts for them. Some may do some designs themselves, but , um , you know, a lot of that is, is , is , you know, assisted by the shaft industry. And , um , what's really ,

Speaker 7:

These companies do that, don't they?

Speaker 8:

Yeah. Sometimes

Speaker 7:

Hama Hama makes her own Shaf

Speaker 8:

Sometimes. Yeah. Yeah. You know, what's interesting to me about it, to be honest with you is , um, I've been on the club, I've been on the club side of the business, like the golf clubs side in so many capacities for so long. Um, what I find really fascinating about shafts and, and that sort of , um , component space in general is that golf clubs are relatively constrained by legal limits. Right. There's things that you just cannot do anymore with a golf club. There's there's parameters of no , no,

Speaker 7:

There's a hundred

Speaker 8:

Percent. You just can't do it. So you make ,

Speaker 7:

You can pay a different color. I mean ,

Speaker 8:

Yeah . Yeah. And to the OEM's credit, like to the engineering team's credit, like they are able to find these kind of cool new ways to stay

Speaker 7:

1%, two cool .

Speaker 8:

And new

Speaker 7:

Technologies.

Speaker 8:

Yeah . New metals, new , whatever it is. And so interesting. And so in the Shaf world, you know, we're not nearly as constrained. And so

Speaker 7:

Can I take my opinion on shafts opinion on chefs? I feel like shafts are the redheaded stepchild . That's what I think

Speaker 8:

There's a little bit of that ,

Speaker 7:

You know , I'm no , I love shafts, right. Like I made a conscious effort when , when I first started doing this, I'm like, I want work chef brands because I think they make cool stuff. They don't get the respect they deserve. Right. They're just like, oh, it's a chef that goes in the club, but it's like, yeah, but this place , like so many different roles , like this is just, just as important as the head con is the head. Right. Yeah. And , and then,

Speaker 8:

And we're able to , um , you know, we're to sort of pick up in some ways where the golf club leaves off. Right. So there's, I think in the future, there will be more and more , um, kind of dependency or leaning on shafts to help with overall club performance, pushing

Speaker 7:

The performance. Cuz they , they hit a wall. We can't do anymore at this . We can paint it. That's about ,

Speaker 8:

And , and look, there's probably, there's an awesome material breakthrough. There's an awesome something just around the corner. That's probably just waiting to be unlocked. So that's not a hard and fast rule to say that, oh , you know, they're maxed out. They'll always figure out cool new ways to innovate. Um, but it's kind of, it's also cool on our side to be able to support that and sort of help drive the overall performance of the golf club because you know, our product does not work without the head , you know, and their product does not work without a shaft. So they have to go together to form a complete club. So the more that we can optimize that relationship the better, and we've started to see , um, you know, a lot of gains with a product like Veis , um , where you just really start to see that a shaft can make a difference and does make a difference and, and can make people that much better. And , uh, it's really exciting to see. I , I , I love it personally.

Speaker 7:

I mean, I've always loved shafts. I don't know why. I just think I there's so many factors in a golf club and it's not just the head. I mean, the thing is too , when you buy new drivers, it's like, okay, now you get to pick, right. Like , oh, what shaft do you want? Right. From the plethora of shaft that , that , that company provides essentially. But it's still like, I don't think people fully understand like how important the shaft is. And like, it's not just like, oh, it's a cool color, right. Or a cool name. It's more like the performance of the shaft.

Speaker 8:

Um , but I mean, I can tell you even being in it, you know, I I've been in the golf business, it's been around golf clubs a long time, even , uh , just being at Fuji URA and seeing what really goes into it and how it's really done. I mean, it, it surprised even me and I thought I was pretty familiar with things and I was still very like, wow, seriously, we're doing this like, cool.

Speaker 7:

So it's like, it blows your mind. And you're

Speaker 8:

Like, whoa , it really does. There's there's an amazing amount of tech in research. Um, in a Fuji career shaft, it's really, it's really something special. And I , Hey man, I came, I came from the fitting days where it was back when shafts are basically like, what color do you like? And how much do you wanna end? Right. That was kind of <laugh> that was literally a SHA fitting. And so to see where, where the industry has gone in the attention that's given to shaft fitting , um, you know, and what it can really do to make players better. It's, it's really inspiring. It makes me excited for the future and , uh , makes me excited for players to, to get their hands on our products.

Speaker 4:

<affirmative>

Speaker 7:

So what, what shafts are you most excited about at Fuji car then ? Like what, what what's coming, not so what's coming out, but like what ones you like, oh , these are really cool, you know?

Speaker 8:

Yeah. You know what, I I'm , I'm gonna be such a brand hero and brand fan right now. I love them all. Yeah. We, we don't, we don't make anything bad. We just don't it . We're not gonna put our name on something that is , isn't really good. And, and we have different, you know, price points too. I think that's important to realize also that , uh , you can get a really high quality Fuji high performance golf shat, and it doesn't have to be a $350 S you know, we , we go all the way down to our Vista pro line and everything in , in between , um, you know, the speeder products are really good. Notator X is a phenomenal shaft , uh , Ventus , and all of its profiles is amazing. Vista pro is, is a , is a club that's dream. You know, we've got a little something for everyone. Um , so from a product perspective , uh , that's one of my favorite things is that we can run the range and everything is good, you know, and we're, we're not gonna make anything that that's not gonna perform at at any level. So , um , you know, what's really cool right now. I mean, obviously we're super psyched about vintage , um , and the new vintage tr it's doing incredibly well, lots of early adoption, which is great to see . Uh, and, and the thing I always , I always talk about with Ventus is you sort of, anytime you launch a new product for anybody, you get some initial months of just buzz and excitement, right? It's a new product. Everybody wants to try it. Everybody wants to give it a shot. But I think what the most powerful story of Ventus is is that it would not sustain its popularity if it didn't continually perform. Right. So at this 0.3 years in we're long past the, oh , it's just a cool new thing to try phase . And we are deep in the, we see it really helping players be better. We see it performing every single fitting. We see it performing on tour every week. And so that really is this awesome Testament to, to what an impressive, if it really is , um, that it's not just kind of some fancy new thing to that caught on that. It really is a revolutionary, you know, piece of equipment. And we're , we're thrilled to have our name on it. And I get the butterflies when I see the little, little vintage of stripes on the tee box on Sunday afternoon golf. It's awesome. Go walk the range at a tour event and it's , uh , it'll make you start .

Speaker 7:

Yeah , look , I'm I'm with that. I mean, it's always exciting when you see that, right. When you're like, whoa, the judge are actually using it like for a reason to win. Not exactly .

Speaker 8:

Exactly .

Speaker 7:

I don't know . This is a dumb question, but I don't know the answer. Do SHA companies sponsor players or is it mainly just we don't head companies? We Don , I guess OEMs, I guess. Yeah ,

Speaker 8:

We don't , um , that's a , it's a player's discretion , uh , which again is just such a cool thing to see that they are, they

Speaker 7:

Chose

Speaker 8:

That they chose it. Right. I mean, that's just even more impactful. So there's always ,

Speaker 7:

Is that industry wide ? I don't know. I'm not trying to sound ignorant that , like ,

Speaker 8:

I couldn't really say I couldn't really cool industry can kind only speak to our own stuff, but , um , yeah , it , look, it it's really cool to see somebody that has the opportunity to try really whatever they want and the best players in the world. That's what they pick. I mean, that makes you feel good. Makes you feel good about what you're doing.

Speaker 7:

So this year, I mean, the new Ventus came out, right? The ,

Speaker 8:

Yeah.

Speaker 7:

Like when did that come out? That came out like recently,

Speaker 8:

February when we were in January and came out retail F one ,

Speaker 7:

Um , who's using on tour. Do you know ,

Speaker 8:

Uh , Jordan speed has it in the fairway wood right now. Um , we've got a lot of guys testing it. Um , it's sort of that initial first few months. Um , it's, it just, you know, it's kinda the way the tour works. It takes a little time to seed things and get things going. Uh , but I expect we'll have some, some pretty good adoption rate . Uh , certainly as a season starts taking off, cuz there's been a lot of interest and there's been a lot of testing and you know, at that level , uh , they're , they're gonna put it through the paces before they, for the commit commit. Um, but we've got it in the , in the conversation with a lot of players and, and they're excited to try it and we're excited to , to hear their thoughts. So it's, it's , it's gonna be good.

Speaker 7:

No , I love, I love how you are on the video for the , the vintage shaft when you click, when you click on it and it's you talking and I'm like, oh, look at that.

Speaker 8:

Yeah . Look at that. It's just movie Star . I'm just some dude that, that lacks golf . That's all I am trust me.

Speaker 7:

So, I mean, what, in your opinion, like what, what shafts would you use in your bag right now? Are you using all, are you using all, could you grow shafts in your bag or

Speaker 8:

So come on . Is that , is that hybrid really gonna ask that question? Yeah, of course. <laugh>

Speaker 7:

But which ones I wanna know. Which ones that you, you like personally for your bag?

Speaker 8:

I like to run the gambit. I'll be honest with you. Um , I've got Ventus in the hybrid. Um , I've got our MCI graphite irons and wed shafts. Um, nice. Right , right now I've got tr in the driver and I've got , uh , speeder NX in the fairway wood . So I've got it spicy .

Speaker 7:

Yeah. I'd be like a kid in a candy store, like right there. That , that's what I would be like. I would just, I would literally have, it would be like a bunch of jelly be everywhere . I'd be grabbing all of them .

Speaker 8:

It's uh, I mean, you can kind of see this, our , our wall of kind of fitting shafts. It's , uh , I always jokingly refrigerator it as going shopping, you know, you'll , you'll kind of see the shopping you of the crew kind of around , uh , you know , two o'clock on Friday. Just do a little shopping, like , oh , I might try something a little different this weekend. I might try this, try that. Uh ,

Speaker 7:

Do you get to do that really?

Speaker 8:

Yeah. I mean, take it out for a round of golf and, and , uh , as long as you bring it back on Monday, right. As long as we don't have a fitting and go to resource , you

Speaker 7:

Take it for a test drive. Yeah . And then you're like, Hmm .

Speaker 8:

Yeah ,

Speaker 7:

Bring it back. And

Speaker 8:

Sometimes, sometimes the test drive gets a little long in the tooth and we have to, you know, you know , track things down, but that's very rare, but , uh , yeah, it's, it's just one of the cool perks of, of being here. It's a lot of fun.

Speaker 7:

So how big is Fujis team here in the United States?

Speaker 8:

We only have about 25 people at the us team. Um ,

Speaker 7:

And they all in California,

Speaker 8:

They are. Yeah. Uh , um , that includes everybody, including our technicians in the back. So it's a small team, which is awesome. Um, we're kind of a big family. Everybody sees each other everybody every day , you know, our's , our president says hi to everybody on the way in every morning and, and by on the way out. So it's a very close-knit group. Um, open air, open office. You

Speaker 7:

Love it. Are you like so happy there? I ,

Speaker 8:

Oh , it's great. People are great. The product's great. You know, golf is booming. I mean,

Speaker 7:

It's like, it's just , it's a very well respect , respected brand. Like, you know what I'm saying? Like when you say food decry , oh , it's good , but that's good . JF . Like everybody says that and I'm not just saying like, yeah .

Speaker 8:

I mean, we've worked really hard to do that. I'll, I'll tell you , I

Speaker 7:

Think a lot of work and it's about your quality, right? I mean ,

Speaker 8:

Yeah , it is . It is . It's a Testament to really , uh , being adamant about putting out the best product we can at all times. Um, I'll kind of tell you a funny Fuji career story. So , um , when I was getting into golf , uh , the friend of mine that got me involved was a really good high school player. And he was really good all the way into college. And he finally , uh , cracked his driver. And I think he had like an old Titleist , you know, 9 83 K or something. He finally cracked the face and, and warranties and repairs said, we'll send you a replacement. We'll send you whatever the most current model is, what shaft you want it and keep in mind, I'm relatively than you to golf at this time. And he goes , uh, he goes, well , uh , what do you have from Fuji URA ? He said, well, we've got this speeder 7 57 . He goes, okay. I want that in the heaviest weight you've got in an X and this is back with Bo through heads . So an X is, I mean, that's just rebar, right?

Speaker 7:

Yeah.

Speaker 8:

So he gets the club in , we take it to the golf course and he's pound in this thing. I mean, just smash and drives and around like the fourth or 15 , he kind of starts doing the grunt. You know, he is going after hits . It's like, like , dude, you good? He's like, man, I feel like my back's about to blow out. <laugh> I's just like, why are you playing the shaft? And he looks at me de the eyes . He's like, it's Fuji , bro. It's the best. And now how ironic, you know, that I'm on the other side of it now. And we were actually talking about that story the other day. And a similar thing happened with Scotty Cameron. Uh , my roommate in , in college had a Scotty Cameron putter. And he was like, oh yeah, you know, I worked with a golf course in high school and this head pro gave it to me as a graduation gift. And

Speaker 7:

That's a big deal. That's a , that's a big

Speaker 8:

Yellow head cover on it, old studio design putter. And I don't , I don't know what I'm looking at. And he was like, yeah,

Speaker 7:

That's cool. Looking platter, whatever.

Speaker 8:

He was like, this is like a , this is like a $250 putter. And I was just like, that is insane. Who's gonna spend $250 on a putter and fast forward, you know , like 10 years later, I'm staying in the gallery , surrounded by putters that are, you know, 10, $15,000. So it's just, it's a trip. How things work out. Right.

Speaker 7:

Well, I mean, I think it's cool because you went from, I don't know , like you work to all cool brands that are actually doing things or

Speaker 8:

I've been really fortunate, man. I I've been very, yeah , but

Speaker 7:

That's a Testament to you though, too. Like, you know, I , it's not, it's not all luck, you know, it's more like people saw something in you , you, you love their product. You wanted to learn more about it. They gave you opportunity, you know? And it's just, I don't know . I think it's really cool.

Speaker 8:

Yeah. I've been , uh , I can't, I , I hope I never have to it, but I can't really imagine having to do marketing or , uh , you know, sales or anything for brand

Speaker 7:

Marketing , like Xerox or something

Speaker 8:

Benign thing . I , I don't wanna knock it. I mean, you know, but it's just , uh , to me that would just seem really challenging. Like, I , I I'm very,

Speaker 7:

So when you were in college and you had your marketing degree, like , what did you like marketing wise ? Like what did you think? Honestly, cause I could tell you what I thought when I was in college, but I thought I was gonna , oh ,

Speaker 8:

I , I thought , I thought I'd be an agency guy. I thought I'd be an ad agency guy. I thought I'd graduate and like mad .

Speaker 7:

Yeah.

Speaker 8:

Cool . And that was before madman too. And I still thought it was cool. Um, but you know, and I have friends that have , have run the agency life and uh,

Speaker 7:

They hate it.

Speaker 8:

They're not huge fans of it. I got a couple that have, that have made their way sort of to claw their way to a position where they can have some stability and some comfort. And, and they like that . So

Speaker 7:

Being a lawyer, dude, it's like, you know it like for reals , it's like, it's all , it sounds all pie in the sky, right? Like , oh, having my crazy money and it's oh no , man. It's like, it's a grind.

Speaker 8:

Well, I like everybody else in college. Uh , thought maybe I go to law school. Uh , and that's why my degree, doesn't My degrees in marketing advertising and my minors in political science. And I was like, oh , I'm just gonna go to law school. And then about halfway , I was like, I'm probably not gonna do that. So gotta find something different,

Speaker 7:

Dude. I was like, I went to school being a pilot and I like went and became a pilot for a while. And then I went to law school. Like if you'd ask me during college O you become a lawyer, like no way, why would I ever do that? You know, <laugh> but

Speaker 8:

Pilot to attorney, and that's an interesting switch. So

Speaker 7:

A guy with a golf podcast weird,

Speaker 8:

But I guess it's no more weird than , uh , advertising degree to washing golf carts. So we all have our weird, our weird journeys. Right. Dude , I

Speaker 7:

Used spoke at airports and like washing airplanes. So I know that's like, yeah , I was the, what I call myself. I , my title was the shop. That's what I wore . And I would like, like ,

Speaker 8:

Do you have that on a business card? Like a name title I

Speaker 7:

Should have had that. I , I remember I had like, and all these , I worked for all these mechanics. Right? Like it was in a big shop. It was hot Phoenix, nasty, hot summer. And I was literally the shop . And they would F with me, they, it would like, my dad was to clean the floors and stuff like that. And I would sweep and whatever. And then they would like this one guy, man, I called him the one eye F U CKA. That's what I called him . I one eye , he had one eye

Speaker 8:

Terminology for your time ,

Speaker 7:

But that's what he was like , that's everybody called him . Cause he is all nasty and mean. And so like, he would, I would sweep and whatever and I'd go. And he would, and he was head of everybody. And then he would purposely like spill oil, like by the airplane and be like, oh, you missed a spot. Like, and started yelling at me. And I'm like, did you just fricking really do that? And then, but this is a good story. So that he was like, I hated my job. Like , I don't even need this job. I was in college. I was like, did it for the summer. I was getting flight lessons at the place next door. I was like, I just need some I'm the airport all day might as well stay here and do some , some work. It was hot. It , so then this guy, so then like one day we're at the side of the shop. Right. And I was cleaning park or something. And he's like, this is golf story. I'm this come back to golf. So he goes, so he's like, oh , you know , and I'm like , I hate this guy. Like , like , no , like I hate this dude. And so , um, look like a pirate for us . Um , but little patch, it was Gros <laugh> and um, he like one-eyed Willy in , um, um , Goonies when the thing like , yeah ,

Speaker 8:

Little solid .

Speaker 7:

Yeah. Nasty. So then like nothing against people with one eyes to say it . Um, but so I was like, Hey, what do you do this weekend? Cause trying to make small. And he is , oh, I'm , I'm like , he's like , oh, I'm golfing. And I was like, like really? And he's like, yeah, I'm going golfing. I'm like, he starts talking to me about golf. And I was like, oh, I play golf too. And he's like, wait, really? Cause I guess like kinda like you, right. When someone sees like potential, he's like really you play golf. And I'm like, yeah. I'm like, and he is like, well , why? And he thought some kind of punk kid, you know, working, working there forever. Right. And I said, no, I'm in college dude. Like, this is like, I'm gonna be out here in six weeks, you know? And then when he realized that he was like, and every , everyone was afraid of this guy, he goes , uh, he took him under his w <affirmative> like right away really ? And like, I played, like I was a normal guy. I played golf, young kid. I wasn't good, whatever. But like he took him to his wink and he started teaching me stuff. And like , we had to be his , the shop after that, like everyone just knew not to mess with me. So that's why I think of you, you cleaning carts, right? Like <laugh> ,

Speaker 8:

I , it wasn't

Speaker 7:

That bad , I guess, but yeah . You like country love .

Speaker 8:

Yeah. Nobody was spilling oil that I had to clean up. So it wasn't that bad. It was just, you know, posing off guards. It wasn't that bad.

Speaker 7:

Oh man, that job was nasty. I mean, no , my job was nasty yours. I probably could've handled it. Maybe. So with the Ventus , like how long has the dentist been out? I like

Speaker 8:

Blue is running on you close to three years now. And then we added , uh , the red and the black about a year into its launch. So it's, it's been , what

Speaker 7:

Do the colors mean? We say red and black and blue. Yeah . Does that mean anything?

Speaker 8:

It does. You know, we kind of, it's, it's an easy system , uh , for both , uh , fitters and players to kind of understand launch characteristics. So , oh , that's cool. Blue is in the middle. It's sort of like a mid, mid, mid launch mids spin . Uh , the black profile is a low launch , low spin . And the red profile is kind of like that mid to high launch mids spin . So it just kind of , it's, it's an easy identifier for players to sort of steer them no

Speaker 7:

Right away what the guy is using. Exactly . And why he uses this . I never knew that I had no idea. Like, I mean , I know like , but when you add, I'm not trying to sound dumb. I'm just like wanting to educate people,

Speaker 8:

These good questions. You're not , cause I

Speaker 7:

Don't question honestly, I'm not a chef person. I mean , I like shafts , but like, so what the tr what does the tr mean?

Speaker 8:

So the tr sort of just fits in between blue and black. Uh , that's essentially, if you're just talking about, like , from a fitting perspective where, where it falls in the line , it's a , it's a little lower launching and spinning than a blue profile, but not quite as low as black , um , when it's

Speaker 7:

Like an in between .

Speaker 8:

Exactly. And , and that's kind of just the way it , it played out a little bit. So anytime we're gonna do a new product, we sort of have a , a little bit of a three steps system of, of , of what we go through in new product development. And the first piece of that is always soliciting feedback. So that feedback's gonna come from our best fitters , uh , from consumers, from PGA tour players, from our charter dealers. Uh, and we kind of take a part that's really successful. And we say, okay, if you were going to make any changes to this, you know, what would you maybe wanna see? And that's kind of where this system behind me with Enzo , uh , comes into play is we've discuss how

Speaker 7:

Does Enzo work? Cause that's really cool.

Speaker 8:

Yeah. So we've got thousands upon thousands upon thousands of combinations of , of what shafts can do during the golf swing. And, and Enzo analytics is just so it's this very deep well that we continually add to that can show us what different performance features in a shaft can really do during a golf swing. So when we take feedback from a group of, of players or a group of fitters or whatever it is, and they say, well, we might like to see it do this, this and this. You know, maybe it feels a little different here. It launches a little different here. We can actually, you know, run that scenario through Inso analytics and say, well, we've done something similar to that. And here's what it would likely produce as far as performance. And so we're really able to sort of fast track our R and D and make our R and D much, much more accurate versus making a bunch of prototypes, kind of thrown stuff at the wall and see what sticks we can be really analytical. And if we make these changes, if we try this design change, if we do this, this, and this, these are likely the results that we'll produce. And if we see something that we, we like, and we see something that can work, we'll build it right here in the back of our shop, we'll prototype it. We test it to death with players of all skill levels. And if it does what we want it to do, then we brand it and it comes to market. So that's a little bit where vintage TRR came from. Was it

Speaker 7:

Almost like speeds up the process? It's not like

Speaker 8:

Huge . It's a very , it's a very pinpointed approach. It's , it's very much a rifle and not a shotgun we're really, you know, targeting very specific things and achieving them. Uh , but that's kind of where, where TRR came from was some of the feedback that we received was, well, we really like this sort of mid-launch mids been profile. It's just a little soft in a handle section. It's just a little forgiving in the handle section. And, you know, when I move into a , a black profile, it's just a little too stout because when you move into profiles like offense black , you're almost gearing it towards players that really don't wanna have a lot of load and feel in the golf swing. They just basically want this really stout piece of rebar to hang with them as they just, you know , knock it out of the park. Um , and so we kind of took that feedback. We go back to NZO analytics and we find all right , when we're slowing these golf swings down to thousands frames per second, we see that the transition from the top of the golf swing into the downswing is an area where the shaft takes on a lot of stress, not just with people with really quick transition, to at any speed. Anytime that motion is changing direction, the shaft takes on additional stress and we sort of pinpointed it . And we said, well, in, in looking at analytics in that mid to handle section, that's really where the shaft takes on the most of that stress. And so if we can do something to reinforce that area and we can eliminate any sort of unnecessary, a twist or unnecessary bending in that section, then we can make a shaft that's that much more stable. And that's really where that vintage tr we integrate that spread toe material, you know, in the handle to upper midsection of the shaft. And what that does is , uh, you know, it bumps the Toal stiffness in that section. If you measured it against vintage blue , it jumps it about 10%, which is quite a bit. And now we're looking at a , a profile that has the same VLO core technology, which has incredible stability. And we've sort of enhanced that technology that much more by integrating this ultra high moist custom fabric to another section of the shaft. And we've just made a part that's that much more stable overall. And we achieve all the benefits we wanted. We stiffened up the handle section a little bit. We lowered the launch, lowered the spin a little bit. And so all these things are not just sort of happenstance of, oh , what would have , if we just kind of did this, like our design engineering team best in the business , uh , incredibly smart, incredibly talented, incredibly innovative. Um, but this is, you know, years in the making, you know, Enzo's 10 years old, it takes so much time to get these things to a place where we can really just really use these target decisions. Yeah . And that's, what's so cool about where we're at right now as a company is , um, we are really firing on all cylinders and we are just making some great product and , um , some really purpose driven product. And , um , you know, the other thing to be cognizant of is everything that we make, it needs to be, there needs to be a player benefit. You know, we could make all kinds of crazy stuff just for the sake of doing it and use wild, exotic materials just to say we did it. But if we can't pinpoint that to player improvement, it's really not a road we go down. Um, so that, that is at the heart and soul of what we do. And also , um, you know, I've heard this from people before, be like, well, I don't really play Fuji care stuff. I'm not a good player, or I don't really swing that heart . So I can't really play Fuji career product . And it's just not true. Um, because any technology that we add into a product, we are very conscious of the fact that it needs to perform, not just for the best players in the world, but it needs to be a technology that's applicable to everybody. And it needs to be able to help everybody at any speed or any skill level. So if anyone out there is gun shy to try , I Fuji thinking like , ah , it's just only for the better players. Like, trust me, we've got an arsenal of amazing product that can cater to literally anyone and it's, it's great .

Speaker 7:

And I think that's the education part, right? Like, I feel like people don't understand about shaft. Like, I mean, gearhead do, and people that have been fitted kind of do right . And they start realizing that there's all these factors that play into your , into your shot. Right. You're saying , but like, then they'd say like, oh, that , that Shas X dollars. Oh, that's not my budget. And it's like, really? Is it because, I mean, is it really? Cause , I mean, it's like, you can get the, the whatever competitor version and be a little bit cheaper, but it's like that it's quality. Like , I don't know when I was kid and dad used to always like , gimme a hard time and be like, oh, you always need the Cadillac for version of everything. And I'm like , no, I just wanna buy something. That's like, you know, that's gonna last, that's really good. Don't have to worry about it. Like doesn't anybody like everybody do that. Like, I mean,

Speaker 8:

I think in the last, even five years you've seen , uh , just such a swell in, in interest of the game, as far as people willing to invest in their equipment, which is just really awesome. Oh yeah. Oh , you know , it's, it's , um, it's not necessarily this thing where it's just , everyone's trying to spend as much as they can, but you're really seeing people take a dedicated interest and it's, I , I just , I , I use that as a , as a backup to your point. It's like, well, you know, golf is something I'm passionate about. It's something I like to do. And , and I would like to pay a little bit more to get the best product that I

Speaker 7:

Can it's performance. It's not

Speaker 8:

As long as it works.

Speaker 7:

Like , like I'm getting fitted right now. Um, and you know, to me, it's not about how pretty your clubs are, right? Oh , you have pretty clubs in your bag, like with custom, you know, and paint and whatever on it, like whatever, you know, like, it's like, can you use it? Is it gonna help you get better? Or just like, when you're playing golf with a bunch of people and you play like crap and you have nice clubs, it's like not nice, but like pretty nice, right? It's almost like it's about the performance of the shaft or the performance of the club. And I think,

Speaker 8:

Yeah , people , I agree ,

Speaker 7:

You know, people come into the game especi in the last couple years, people come into the game, they don't know what to buy. Right. They have no idea and they're just coming kind of word or mouth and what they can afford. But like, as you really start doing the research, it's like certain brands stand out. Would you current being one of 'em that like, you know, if you want to better your shot, really, you, you get what you pay for. And I mean, you , your guys' reputation's phenomenal. I mean, what you

Speaker 8:

Call , well, that's very , the very kind of you to say, and that's really good to hear cuz uh , it's Def that's definitely something that's important to us and, and, you know, you make a , you make an excellent point it's um , and this is a Testament to the, the club industry overall is that there's so many options right now for players of all skill levels. Um , and it used to just kind of be, you know, either had players irons or these big, chunky game improvement irons. And that was it. And now there's just a myriad of options, you know, from top to bottom , um, that kind of suited all players. So it's, it's an exciting time to be in golf on the equipment side. Um , for, for me, it's a very exciting time to be on the component side. I love where we're going and what we're doing with shafts. I think it's awesome. Um, I , I, couldn't be more proud of the work that we're putting out and , um, the benefit of, of being here and working behind the ropes is I see the things that are coming in the , in the future years and it , it gets me even even more .

Speaker 7:

Yeah, but you probably see stuff right now, it's happening in the like , Cool. And this comes out.

Speaker 8:

Yeah . And it's a , and you get that, you get that vibe in the office too. You know, we,

Speaker 7:

We excitement

Speaker 8:

We're working on some cool stuff and , and the , the pulse is, is kind of racing around the office and that's, that's just such a cool thing to see.

Speaker 7:

Well, I, I'm a fan. I've always been a fan I've been working . I appreciate a long time . Um, I think you guys make phenomenal shafts , um, where , so I might , my last question to you is if somebody wants a Fuji cur shaft, like how do they go about doing that?

Speaker 8:

You know , so we've got , um , over 600 charter dealers , um , in the us , um , that fit and sell Fuji cur shafts. And you can actually line them on our website. There's a dealer locator, just type in your zip code. It'll tell you where the nearest dealer is to you. Um , now this is , uh , both something that we say as a company, but as an old school die hard fitter , um , just get fit for your product. Uh, you know, I , I can't encourage it enough. And I think people now are just much more open to that idea, but there's so many places to get fit and we've got such it's

Speaker 7:

Affordable. It's

Speaker 8:

Totally , I mean , seriously, and it's worth it. Even, even if there's a fee for it , it's worth it. And we've got such an incredible , uh , group of charter dealers, our charter dealer network, just excellent people , um, that provide excellent fitting services and business services. And, and so there's just so many ways that you can get your hands on Fuji ke product in the right ways. Um, yeah,

Speaker 7:

Like don't just go buy , you can just buy it online if you want and then put it in yourself or it's like, why don't you get fitted for it? So that it actually it's the right shaft. Don't just get a Fuji Kera shaft , like get the right shaft. That's actually gonna help you as a Fuji . Totally

Speaker 8:

Different . Totally like , and , uh , that's too . Yeah . That's , that's absolutely the best bet. Uh , just go to a dealer locator at Fuji care , golf.com um , type in your zip code, find somebody near you. They'll they'll get you squared away.

Speaker 7:

Um, I guess my last question for you is, is there some new stuff coming out soon? I actually get excited about

Speaker 8:

Paul . There's always new stuff.

Speaker 7:

Any new launches in the next six months you call you also Paul , be like, yeah, we have some new stuff coming out. You can say that.

Speaker 8:

Let's see how politically I can answer this question. Um,

Speaker 7:

Yes.

Speaker 8:

We've got some exciting things planned for the future. <laugh>

Speaker 7:

The future being in this year or the future being like it's sometime in the next millennia.

Speaker 8:

Yes. To both. <laugh> okay .

Speaker 7:

That's funny.

Speaker 8:

Definitely to the second one. Yeah.

Speaker 7:

Well I think it's, I think it's great. I really appreciate you being on the show today. You guys chefs they're they're really, they're amazing. Um, and what was the website again? They wanna just do more research on the different types of GCI CRO , the Fuco golf

Speaker 8:

Fuco golf.com . We got , we got everything up there for you .

Speaker 7:

Awesome. Well, I will see you guys in the next episode.

Speaker 3:

Thanks for listening to another episode of behind the golf brand podcast. You're gonna beat me a golf stay connected on and off the show by visiting golfers authority.com. Don't forget to like subscribe and leave a comment. Golf is always more fun when you win, stay out of the beach and see you on the green .